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Library Blog
I am trying out Plugoo on my website, which is an instant messaging application that you can integrate into your website. I think this is a...
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14 years ago
Hopefully this week will begin the discussion of a new visual mapping/browsing tool. The browsing tool will be for traversing data in a network structure similar to the Education Map we made some time ago. At the Doc.Life seminar I passed out a quick document to introduce the idea. For those of you who didn't get it, here it is. And for those of you who got the file but didn't "get it," I apologize for not taking more time to explain myself. The document suggests that there is a need to re-think browsing/sear...
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I know there has been lots of discussion about social networking sites like Facebook or MySpace, mainly because of privacy reasons, however, an article in the New York Times today highlights another feature of sites like this; the ability for high school seniors that already know where they will be attending in the fall to meet with students in their class online before they meet in person at orientation (read the article here). In the article, a high school senior is highlighted. The senior, Monique Y...
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14 years ago
A thread about incorporating social networking into library web sites is starting on USABILITY4LIB. A librarian from one large private, proximate ivy league university library posted these reasons where her library had not engaged in social networking so far. I've done some research on the potential for using social networks to engage students in library activities/marketing, and find that it's generally not been a useful tool for many libraries. This is based on my reading of the literature out there, not experience, but I think there are two main problems: 1. Students ...
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14 years ago
The American Scholar briefly noted that Rice UP has decided to re-launch as a completely digital operation. This press release has some more details. I think this is a step in the right direction for Rice, and I wonder what TSI thinks of the publishing platform Connexions (see Linda's blog from last summer for more info) that it is to run on.
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Karen Bryner, Anthony Cocciolo, and I have been working to put together some resources for the Teaching the Levees Project. One of the things we've been looking for is interactive maps and timelines. One that we like so far is from the Times-Picayune. Another that I liked (but unrelated to the Levees Project) was from the BBC that m...
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Hi Dan: I had a chance to review the docs you gave me. Alas, given where I stand pre AERA (and post Gary), I don't think I will be able to make it tomorrow. So, for what its worth, here are my comments. They range from the general to the specific.... 1) Fantastic idea. Much needed. Wish I had it. The only conceptual issue you may face is that a lot of what this needs to do is content management/work-flow type functionality that frankly is desperately needed at TC in other contexts. So the back end of Doc.Life feels like it can/should be used for other purposes (e.g. File content ...
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14 years ago
If anyone has suggestions about digitization equipment for the 2nd floor depot, I'd be interested in hearing them. At the moment two fujitsu scanners and two sony video-to-DVD recorders are already in house. Other pieces will no doubt be necessary and my familiarity with Macs and their compatibility with this equipment is less than ideal, so suggestions on that score are particularly welcome. In a more general way, ideas about particular disciplinary/departmental research practices that already are (or have the potential to be) digitally intensive would be useful not only in setting up th...
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For another perspective and a bit more information on the recent "banning" of Wikipedia as a source by the Middlebury history department, see We Can't Ignore the Influence of Digital Technologies by Cathy Davidson.
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A team of researchers at the National Institutes of Health are developing an algorithm to better predict the wishes of individuals who are unable to make medical decisions (e.g., people in comas). Would you trust a computer to decide whether you remain on life support or not? It may be more accurate than a surrogate decision maker (i.e., family, loved ones).
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