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Thinking about our discussion, I had the insight (!) that the way I figure out what is important or interesting is by observing what others think is important or interesting (or even funny) -- especially people I consider experts (or with whom I know I already agree). We're not doing solutions, but... If I could search for knowledge/information using a varietly of aliases, that would help me. I'd be willing to start with me -- some construction of my identity based on what I deemed to be my interests, projects, best work etc. -- and get whatever results that tossed up. But then I'd like to go ...
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Hui Soo and I met (with atelier-like participation from Mike) on an education event/exhibition for the library that is timed to coincide with the playoffs/world series -- that is from October 17th to the 29th. The purpose of the event would be both fun and educational. Check out what we have come up with and let me know (1) what you think conceptually and (2) thoughts about the logistics and implementation. We divided our ideas into two categories, display/environment and program. Display/Environment: - posting baseball pennants for the 6 teams in the playoffs and pulling them down as t...
In case you missed it, there was an interesting article -- "The Past, in Pixels" -- in The City section of Sunday's New York Times. All about New York City, it's being done by the U of Michigan and funded by a local lawyer. http://www.hti.umich.edu/m/moagrp/
15 years ago
Since I bugged everyone so much about preparing for the seminar, I'd like to know what you think worked and what didn't. Obviously, it didn't exactly go in any of the directions we'd talked about. What are your observations? What should I/we have done differently? (How about those circles? They really worked great, right?!)
15 years ago
Is it me (i.e. my postings), or is no one using the blog? Why?
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15 years ago
In THE KITE RUNNER, Khaled Hosseini portrays the effects of a half-century's tumultuous politics on the people and culture of Afghanistan. In part a coming-of-age story, the novel begins in the 1970's, and is told through the relationship between the narrator, Amir, and his friend/servant/constant-companion Hassan. Although Amir's father is not religious, he and his son are Sunni and privileged. Hassan is Hazara, a member of the underclass. In the excerpt that Barry Rosen has picked for us, Amir is a school boy who is learning to read and write, while Hassan stays behind to do the menial c...
15 years ago
Barry Rosen: Guiding Questions (Sorry that the topic sounds like the teacher's edition of a textbook. Ugh.) I want some help thinking of specific questions for our Wednesday conversation, not necessarily just for Barry (at all!) but for ourselves and the (so far quite a few) people from outside the lab who will join us. A reminder that the organizing concept is to use Barry's visit to hear about his education project in Afghanistan and then use his experience as an opportunity to examine our educational system — to “seeâ€? with new eyes. (Organizationally, I'm thinking 20-30 min...
15 years ago
Michael asked me to work with Barry on next week's seminar. After talking with Barry, Michael and Clifford, it seems to me that at least one interesting way to connect Barry's experience in Afghanistan to the work we are doing is to use it as a "what does the earth look like from Mars" opportunity. The notion is that much of what we live with in our own educational system -- its infrastructure, its content, values and purposes -- become invisible to us unless we leave and look back. If we are developing an agenda that challenges (or even transcends/bypasses) the existing system, I think it is ...
I was just re-reading a discussion from June -- Lin, Gary, Brian -- on browsing and serendipity. The opera house was very impressive, especially the tennis balls. How do museums preserve special exhibits after they've been taken down? Since so much of the experience is spacial, have they already figured out a way to capture physical spaces that allow online visitors to stumble around the exhibit and randomly look at stuff?
15 years ago
This is a "what we noticed" list, not necessarily a set of problems: 1. some student groups block long periods of time on multiple days -- currently "AGXB," regression analysis, dissertation group X. 2. there are many "repeaters" on the system -- i.e., the total number of unique reservers might be interesting to count 3. student groups are registered in one name only -- that is, the system doesn't record who else will be in the room. 4. sometimes reserved rooms aren't being used (like when the principal's group vacated multiple small rooms to go outside and take advantage of the ni...