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Many of you expressed interest in seeing the results of playing Exquisite Corpse, the collaborative sequential narrative game at Gameshow NYC. It's posted here, with my appreciation to all who participated in its creation. (The  Exquisite Corpse created by participants at my session on 'The Jester's Guide to Creative See[k]ing' can be seen at the post Jester's Exquisite Corpse.) Questions or comments are, of course, welcome. Enjoy, and thanks. Diane SMILING AT STRANGERS:* The EXQUISITE CORPSE at GameShow NYC (*Note: Forward slash [/] i...
Great to see so many of you participating in the session on Jesters and creative see(k)ing. Copied below is your amazing collaborative discourse that both IS-- and is about-- play, ambiguity, uncertainty, and risk-taking beyond the 'frame.' Jester’s Exquisite Corpse* 5/26/11 (*Note: a forward slash [/] indicates the beginning of a new player’s contribution.) The creative mind, Jung said, plays with the objects it loves. The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct/ the utterings of  a fool who enjoys the moon...
The jester’s original function was to recite jests—narrative tales of heroic exploits (O.Fr. geste “action, exploit, romance”). Like fabled tricksters, they amused, cajoled, spun ludic into lucid and transported listeners by weaving together is-was-and-could-be. Both mythic and real, tricksters draw us into this “uncanny territory, a space ruled by the disarming charm of the very young child. It is a traveler’s space where everything is on the road, cut loose from any clear locale. Here the citizens walk their livestock backward and speak a weird reversing language” (Hyde 1995). In an...