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A teaser of what you'll see in my mSchool course. Economics & Technology
Reynolds, Arthur J. Temple, Judy A. Ou, Suh-Ruu. Arteaga, Irma A. White, Barry A. B. (2011). School-Based Early Childhood Education and Age-28 Well-Being: Effects by Timing, Dosage, and Subgroups. Sciencexpress. (10.1126) 1-11. For those who might recognize this study, I blogged briefly about this study and the coverage it received from popular intellectuals like Matt Yglesias and Megan McArdle. This study focuses on the long-term effects of publicly funded interventions that allowed inner-city student...
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Barton, Keith C. Thornton, Stephen J.(2011). "Can History Stand Alone? Drawbacks and Blind Spots of a 'Disciplinary' Curriculum" Teachers College Record Volume 113 Number 11, 2011, p. - 'http://www.tcrecord.org' ID Number: 16106, Date Accessed: 7/21/2011 5:44:45 PM This article focuses on whether history education can be separated from social studies education, as many historians and history educators have preferred for a while now. At the crux of this issue is the differences held between history and social studies educators...
This post is more economics than education, but the basic nature of selling knowledge as a good or service makes this story relevant. Many have been singing the praises of the NYT paywall, given the jump they've seen in the number of subscribers. As a result, analysts are improving their ratings of NYT stock and other publications are ente...
As Steve and Hui Soo know, I take a lot of pride in my geographic knowledge (just quiz me on any geography trivia)...maybe even a tad boastful. So I was quite curious to see what the latest report from the NAEP said about the state of geography education. Turns out we are doing a better job of educating our young'uns (grade 4), as there have been statistically significant gains from 1994 test scores. Moreover, low-performing students of grades 4, 8, and 12 all showed improvements from 1994 scores. On the other hand, th...
John Tierney writes in the New York Times about the costs of safety-first playgrounds that offer little to no physical challenge or risk. On the one hand, there are rarely, if ever, incidents where permanent physical damage occurs from playground equipment. On the other, there are many psychological benefits to intimidating and challenging playground apparatus, such as tall slides and jungle gyms. Unfortunately, fears of litigation, safety guidelines, and parental concerns have led to the removal of challenging playground e...
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Matthew Cameron has a good piece on one of the problems with reforming higher ed. The way most regents boards are constructed for state universities, governors are able to nominate political allies and donors to the boards with ease. What results is a fairly unqualified, disinterested, and ineffective board for enacting necessary changes to make higher education more efficient. What is perhaps saddest about this situation is that there are such obvious...
Leafsnap is an iPhone app that serves as a mobile field guide for exploring the variety of flora that exists in the northeastern United States. The purpose of this app is to be able to easily identify species of trees and plants simply using visual recognition technology and the camera on an iPhone. The app also contains a fantastically large set of pictures of each of the tree species available in its field guide. Pros: The app comes with a simply enormous set of hi-res photos of ...
As Eric Hanushek writes in Education Next, California's legislature is cutting down on the length of the school year, a horrible idea as far as educational policy goes. Yet what's worse is that this is a terrible fiscal trick as well. Never mind the obvious effects less time in the classroom have on student achievement, is this really going to save California a lot of money? More students will have to be held back and more will likely involve themselves in costly social ills that ultimately require governmen...
As I noted in today's Trends in Ed post, PARCC are not going through with their "through-course" testing design, which would have involved creating four quarterly summative tests to be used for accountability purposes. This was largely a missed opportunity to move away from a testing model that relies on a sample size of one end-of-the-year summative test that currently lies at the center of accountability metrics. It seems wiser to look at measures throughout the year to determine whether end-of-the-year scores are truly accurate and representative a student's knowledge and a teacher's effica...