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In light of a blog post by Scott K. arguing the value of teaching mathematics in high school, I decided to browse the NY Times Education section, and found this interesting opinion piece . The writer basically describes that evaluation of teachers and students rely too much on standardized testing. She writes that there should not be such high-stake accountability on tests that are often "erratic" and "inherently unreliable". Instead, she argues that ...
Another thing I have found (through literature reviews) is that giving students more freedom in their work ultimately leads to better, more innovative ideas. I think this is partly due to the idea that ownership leads to having more pride in your work, which in turn makes you want to work harder, longer, and smarter on a particular assignment. That's the idea behind the 20% project. This blog that I found outlines how a teacher can implement a 20% project in their classroom. For ...
During my weekly sifting of MindShift, I came across this blog (albeit, a bit older) on the increasing trend of educational apps (specifically on the Ipad). This blog from MindShift details some pretty interesting statistics that I thought I would share. The list below are not all of the stats listed, but ones that I thought were interesting take aways from the blog, and something to keep in mind when developing EdLab educational apps. Over 80% of ...
8 years ago
One aspect of education I'm a big fan of is the idea of inquiry-based learning. Moreover, it's the idea that learning material is more than being talked to and remembering facts. It's also about creating your own questions, getting hands-on experience in exploring different solutions, and learning from not only your teacher, but also your peers.
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After today's D&R and some conversations about online learning afterwards, I started to look for any recent articles that address online learning. I came across this article from the Atlantic business section on selling the college experience to students who take classes online. It makes the interesting point that regardless of how improved and effective the content can and will be in the future for online college courses, there will still be a desire fo...
8 years ago
So I've blogged about a few articles/blogs from MindShift this summer, and I thought this would be a good opportunity to blog about this great website. Specifically, the website's description is: "Technology is revolutionizing the world of education — replacing familiar classroom tools and changing the way we learn. MindShi...
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The New York Times recently published an article outlining a very new and potentially game-changing way of learning online: Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs. This article does a great job of explaining exactly what MOOCs are, the potential benefits of them, the inherent downsides, and their future role in the college system. Coursera,a year-old company founded by two Stanford University computer scientists, is leading the way for MOOCs and are ex...
8 years ago
Being a graduate engineering student, I always encourage those going to college to look into the engineering discipline (or any STEM discipline for that matter). One problem that many institutions have when convincing future students to major in engineering is the rigid curriculum that it is often in place. With so many varying interests among students (even within the same major) there needs to be a push for flexible, independent engineering curricula throughout the nation. This will give students a chance to not only gain the core concepts and ideas behind their studies, but explore the di...
Earlier I stumbled across this YouTube video detailing some of the statistics of our current education system. It has some very interesting and eye opening numbers, and really provides some legitimate motivation to get involved in the field of education. It also has a good Snow Patrol song playing in the background, in case you're a fan. It also mentions a grassroots movement called StudentsFirst.Org, led by Michelle Rhee, the former chancellor of D.C public schools. It is a...
I'm full day into my internship, and I can already tell this is a great company to work for. Between the background reading I was doing on Latent Semantic Analysis and general EdLab stuff, I cam across a blog I found to be quite interesting (and maybe something I/we could get involved in here). It's a blog by Dr. Keith Devlin, a mathematician at Stanford University and the Math Guy on NPR's Weekend Edition. I saw him speak at a seminar at North Carolina State University, and wanted to share some of his thoughts on how we could design video games to support good math learning. The interestin...