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Jason Kottke writes a good send up of how mobile devices, primarily the iPhone, are competing with a wide variety of businesses, pretty much every business that trades in "entertainment and information". I think it's worth the read. Some of what he says is stating the obvious but applies to a lot of Lab ideas and projects.
According to the Times Asus, the comapny responsible for the first netbooks, will venture into the E-Reader market. The article claims Asus will create a full color and more versatile E-Reader. I am not sure what "more versatile" means but I could see Asus basing the E-Reader's OS on the Linux Kernel or just using a version of Ubuntu, which they do with their EEE-PC netbooks. An Open Source E-Reader would allow other developers to create reader software, something that will surely make th...
11 years ago
Mashable's Social Good Conference was held this past Friday at the 92 Street Y. Below you can find the entire livestream of the event. If you want to start your day off with a warm fuzzy feeling, though, I suggest you fast forward to the last 2 minutes of the video when COO Adam Hirsch proposes to Managing Editor Sharon Feder! I bet the hashtags were flying :)
I just found out about Mag.ma, a site that aggregates and displays web video from a variety of sources. The site bills itself as a sort of TV Guide for the web. It, of course, allows users to create accounts and build their own profiles of web video content. This could be an interesting outlet for the video work coming out of AfterEd and the EdLab in general.
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John Maeda, formerly of MIT and now president of RISD, has a nice article in MIT's Technology Review about Processing and the students of his who started the project. The article is certainly a teacher marveling in the accomplishments of his students, but it also illuminates how teachers can learn from students, even when they are reluctant about a student's ideas. Maeda touches on the right things that Ben Fry and Casey Reas did in building the Processing application as well as the...
Personas is a project from the Sociable Media Group at MIT Media Lab. It is a Flash application that tells you everything about yourself, or people with your name at least. This information is gleaned from a variety of online sources. It was difficult to get good results using my name because there are hundreds of people of with my exact first, middle, and last name. Molly fared much better with actual results about herself. Once the application is finished it outputs a color coded guide aggregat...
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While I know the subway fairly well and don't feel a need for this, this application and it's technology is astounding. Augmented Reality is certainly a manifestation of futuristic ...
Makerbots are robots that make things. They are actually 3D printers based on the "RepRap" model of 3D printers that can manufacture all the materials needed to replicate that model of printer. The great thing about the first Makerbot product, the Cupcake CNC, is that it is only $750. That seems like a lot but not when you contrast that price with what more "pro", as in professional and proprietary, 3D printers go for. Of course the one drawback is the size of the objects you can print. The Cupcake is called that because the manufacturers say a mode...
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Art and Code was a symposium/conference/workshop at Carnegie Mellon that took place last month. Golan Levin, the conference organizer, wrote this in the Motivation section of the conference website: Just as true literacy in English means being able to write as well as read, true literacy in software demands not only knowing how to use commercial software tools, but how to create new software for oneself and for others. Today, everyday people are still woefully limited in their ability to create their own software. Many would like to create their own programs and interactive artworks, but fear that programming is “too hard.” The problem, it turns out, may not be programming itself so much as the ways in which it is conventionally taught.
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