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As we're approaching the most celebrated day on earth, December 25th, or Christmas Day, I'd like to share with you images of the iconic Santa Claus we may not have seen. Although the red-and-white garbed version of St. Nick wasn't actually invented by the Coca-Cola Company, it actually pinned the image of a chubby, friendly man with white beard in a red outfit on the global imagination. This is one of the first Santa Claus ads from Coca-Cola presenting the Santa as we know today: Before Coca-Cola, S...
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I'm reading Alvin Toffler's Revolutionary Wealth and there's an interesting chapter on America's school system that I'd like to sum up and share. Background It should be noted, for those who are not familiar with Alvin Toffler's elements, that he divided revolutions and wealth into three waves: The First Wave: The Shift from Hunting and Gathering to Sowing and Reaping The first revolution happened when humans stopped being nomadic and started planting. This caused our ancestors to root down and ...
As a (self-indulged) tinkerer of the internet and electronics, I envy how newer generations have tools like Little Bits to get started playing, learn electronics and the basis of the Internet of Things. (Not so) Recently, some cool folks at IBM came up with Node RED, a GUI-based programming interface for anyone to easily prototype his internet-connected device idea. (For anyone who's familiar with Pure Data and Max/MSP, you'll be right at home). Node RE...
This is a cartoon from a quote by Richard Feynman, one of the greatest thinkers and most poetic physicists of all time. This actually has to do with the "artistic-I-only-appreciate-what-I-feel" vs the beauty of science and knowing how things work. In short, I think science and technology do not have to be bland and subtracting from the quality of being humans if we learn how to use them creatively and productively.
I've found this blog post by Sarah Adler, a 24-year-old, Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of a startup that just raised $2 million. She studied Journalism and Religious Studies in college, and has the last look any engineer would expect from his CTO. This is the Facebook comment she posted on her blog to show comments from engineers about her as CTO (or at least someone like her). She also gave an example of the great L...
Last time round I posted about Milton Glaser's book cover design. I want to tell a brief story of how this legendary graphic design icon created the simplest logo that has been distributed and imitated all over the world and how it saved New York from bankruptcy. Consisting of rounded slab serif t...
I've stumbled upon this great gallery 50 Coolest Book Cover Designs Ever and I'd like to share a few of my favorites, as a designer and reader. George Orwell's 1984. Designed by Shepard Fairey If you have seen the famous Red-blue graffiti-like portrait of Obama's Change campaign, that's one of this controversial street artist's work. Great match of artist and book. Again...
I've done a little fun homework using BeautifulSoup to scrape our Edlab blog up to page 50 and decide who has the most comments around. Snapshot of all Edlabbers and number of comments for public posts (not counting private ones) You can read more and see the script on my Medium blog or ask for your number of comments from me. This technique can be used i...
Want to beat the hackers at their own game, learn various vulnerabilities as a web designer and developer or just learn how to protect yourself as a user? Try Google Gruyere, a web application intentionally created with all the vulnerabilities such as Cross-site Scripting (XSS), Cross-site Forgery (XSF), Denial of Service (DoS) and many more for anyone to hack in and break LEGALLY! Each instance of Gruyere web app is generated for each user, ...
These are some outputs from an Arduino after I read it via serial. It is equivalent to "Hello, I'm fine and ready!" The repetition of the output almost made a 3D Ascii art that I thought was nice. Accidentally nice.