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In what will be my final contribution to this site I would like to continue the line of inquiry I established in my previous two posts, which examine alternately the historical origins of unschooling and of self-directed learning and propose a more focused study of the social, political, and other contexts that combine to enable us to consider the self as an individual agent and learning as a particular type of (classifiable) activity. Implicitly, in arguing in the course of these posts as I have, for the generation of a sociology of self-directed learning, I have hoped to frame this pursuit a...
9 months ago
George, Ching-Fu, and I have been tasked with looking into the possibility of incorporating voice systems into the operations of the library—to respond to patron queries, to provide releva...
Previously I explored the strained relationship between advocates of traditional schooling and of self-directed education. Drawing on the political, social, and cultural inertia that has developed around schools, the former group retains a belief in the importance of these institutions to a democratic republic, to the economy, or to a collection of other projects, as well as a corresponding level of trust in their ability to meet the attendant potpourri of demands we place on them. Conversely, reacting against the standardization, bureaucratization, and professionalization administrative progr...
In 1970, the Croatian-Austrian philosopher Ivan Illich—not to be confused with Tolstoy’s famous character, “Ivan Ilyich”—published his now-famous Deschooling Society, a critical exploration of the ways in which the modern education establishment interfaces with the exigencies of modern economies. Rather than places of authentic learning, development, interaction, and academic engagement, in this work Illich conceptualize...