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Games make headlines.  They do more than intrigue; they endear themselves to us, giving grown-ups opportunities to re-imagine or re-live in the virtual world the "play" lost to adolescence. Maybe that's too biblical an explanation for gaming's appeal. Reasons aside, the political debates of the early 2000s about violent video games, which spilled out of the 1999 Columbine shooting aftermath, seem long gone. So much of the media hype surrounding games to which I'm most attuned concern how ...
In a bit of cursory research conducted for last week's post on currents of change and debate in the humanities, I came across Omeka, a web publishing and curatorial tool created by George Mason University's Center for History and New Media (CFNM). Home to an assortment of academics, educators, and developers, CFNM's charges itself with churning out tools designed to make the cre...
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I am thoroughly and completely a humanist, as far as my college education goes. The closest I've gotten to a course that involved any rigorous quantification was an upper level geometry class of four, with no work and no assessments, which the professor encouraged me to take so I could provide a little historical context about Euclid. Naturally, then, I take an active interest in conversations about the future of humanities in higher education, which have been particularly prevalent in the past two years. Simply put, these conversations tend to concern the evolving (or not) nature of humani...
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So, you're lounging in a park, in an orange tanktop and a cap, on a Tuesday. But you're in Paris, and you don't speak French. After drinking a soda, you really want to litter, but you have a hunch there's a sign that says "No Littering." Luckily, you have Fluensee, or Google Goggles, or both, on your phone, so you double check. Here's the catch: using y...
The Digital Divide no longer longer brings to mind the same concerns about the haves v. have-nots it once did. Increasingly, investigations into disparities in internet access focus on the types of access that characterize different demographic groups' ways of connecting to the web. Disparities in access, though widely referenced, only tell one part of the story. As some data put together...
9 years ago
Per Jeff's recent post on the NYT's Learning Network, I'm assuming it has not been an object of much conversation here. From what I'd seen of it until recently, I thought it was mostly a teaching tool for young(er) online readers. Friday's segment, though, made me think differently. Guest-written by Ryan Goble, who seems like he i...
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Charting the future of libraries has no simple alchemy to it. Part prediction, part forecasting (and, possibly, part playing the jeremiad), academic research libraries are learning to re-orient their vision. In "Futures Thinking For Academic Librarians: Higher Education in 2025," the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) spells out 26 scenarios, or characteristics, of learning in institutions of higher education that will affect the function and direction of libraries over the next ...
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9 years ago
FYI, looks like a TED event specifically on education is happening in Denver tonight: http://tedxdenvered.com/
In case you only managed to scan the education headlines of the past two weeks, allow me to piece together the narrative subtext for you. A country knee-deep in reasons to worry about losing its competitive advantage over the rest of the world turns to its universities to spearhead the effort to maintain excellence, only to find loan sharks and crooks guised in velvet tams. Real educational innovation, meanwhile, has shifted to a new breed of institution that eschews all academic convention and instead directs its energy and talent towards confronting the planet's most pressing problems hea...
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9 years ago
Slate's resident tech expert relates his experience with the inaugural release of a new gaming system that relies not on a fancy piece of hardware to deliver you the latest in mind-bursting graphics, but on the internet. OnLive, the producer, relies on cloud computing (and cozy relationships with ISPs) to let you do from any old computer what you'd otherwise have to run from a piece of hardware. How might this potential extend beyond the corporate gaming community?