This website uses cookies and similar technologies to understand visitors' experiences. By continuing to use this website, you accept our use of cookies and similar technologies,Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

6 years ago
If you're looking for a great "longread", I highly recommend this excellent New York Times Magazine article (which I have to thank Louis for sending to me) about Silicon Valley start-ups and engineers, with some strong connections to education. It raises an interesting issue — we talk about the STEM shortage all the time, but even if hypothetically we solved that problem by getting more people to study STEM subjects in school, then the next problem is where these STEM-educated grad...
1 Comment
6 years ago
I showed this to a couple of you already, but a friend who works at BuzzFeed shared this with me and I thought it was fascinating: Here is the original BuzzFeed post. My reaction?
6 years ago
I'm surprised this wasn't more widely publicized, but YouTube recently introduced an opt-in "beta" feature that allows you to view YouTube without any of the comments. They say that the purpose is "to serve YouTube video watch pages with the lowest latency possible", but it's interesting to consider in the light of YouTube often being criticized for having some of the worst comments on the Internet. So even though they say it's for bandwidth reasons, it can really turn watching a YouTube video into an entirely different experience. I'm going to venture a guess that their user exper...
6 years ago
This has been around for a couple of weeks and you might have already seen it, but I don't watch a lot of live TV, so I only saw this for the first time this week. I like how it's kind of a tongue-in-cheek poke at the world of analytics and big data... and how things can go really wrong if you're not doing proper analysis of the data you've collected.
6 years ago
October 15th has been unofficially declared Ada Lovelace Day in honor of the world's first computer programmer, who happened to be a woman. For her story and why it matters, please take a minute to read this article from The Ada Initiative entitled "Deleting Ada Lovelace from the History of Computing". The idea is not just to honor Ada herself, but the many women throughout history who have not been properly credited for t...
6 years ago
The grad program I attended, ITP, is a great place that's earned a fair amount of recognition for the work done by its graduates -- though more commonly for projects produced after they leave, and not for projects that were done while they were at ITP. The most notable exception up until now was Foursquare, which Dennis Crowley began building while at ITP and which was bought by Google shortly after he graduated. Well, today I was happy to discover that there's finally another such ITP s...
6 years ago
Turns out that the idea that Michael Groenendyk proposed in a recent seminar is not seen as quite so farfetched by other libraries. Chicago Public Library's Harold Washington Library Center just opened a maker lab yesterday that's fully staffed and stocked with "three MakerBot Replicator 2 3D printers, two laser cutters, a milling machine and a vinyl cutter, plus a selection of software". Full story here.
1 Comment
6 years ago
This seems particularly timely since we just heard Michael Groenendyk's fascinating seminar on the new opportunities created by evolving 3D printing and 3D scanning technologies yesterday. 3D printing giant Stratasys acquires MakerBot in $600M deal MakerBot Sells to Stratasys for $403M Supposedly, Makerbot will continue to operate as an independent comp...
6 years ago
Last winter, Manav and I both simultaneously blogged about the NYTimes interactive multimedia piece Snowfall, which ended up winning a Pulitzer Prize. Well, last week The Guardian managed to 1-up the NYT with their new interactive multimedia piece,
6 years ago
Hui Soo asked me to look more into O'Reilly Atlas, the responsive publishing tool that we were introduced to at FluentConf 2013. Here's everything I know/my understanding of it: The platform is based on Git (version control), but for text content. In other words, it uses all of the same processes that we developers use (eg. commits, reverts, branches, pull requests, etc.), but now it's intended to be used for written content instead of for code, to make it easier for writers to collaborate (or just to keep track of different drafts and revert to older versions of specific parts of...