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10 years ago
There's been some interest in translation technologies here at the lab over the last year, so I want to post some media items that came up in the last few weeks. First is this video on Google Translate, which explains how it works on a very high level. It makes it sound so much easier than it really is!
10 years ago
This is a really interesting article for anyone who is interested in the ETextbook business: I still cling to my hard books even though all the material is available on the web, but I'm entirely not sure why I do that. Some of the explanations are in here, and they include: 1) Easiness on the eyes 2) Easier to carry around 3) Less distractions I think that 1 and 2 can be fixed by improvements in technology, but I'm not so sure about 3. Sometimes you just want to unhook yours...
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10 years ago
WolframAlpha came out last year as a computation engine, and I use it quite a bit to do quick mathematical calculations that my desktop's calculator feature just won't do. Like integrals. The engine actually does a lot more than that, and they have some sample searches that show it's varied features. I noticed today that they have an education section on their discussion board where people go to discuss the educational uses for such a tool: The discussions are interesting, and i...
10 years ago
This GPS treasure hunting game looks like a lot of fun to me. Thoughts?
editor: Max Sklar We reviewed several Game of Life Simulators, but these three have some unique attributes are worth looking into. Each of them is free and runs either on the web or on the desktop. See this post for more information. Alan Hensel's Game of Life Applet, 1999 http://www.ibiblio.org/lifepatterns/ This applet was created over ten years ago, but it is still a classic. Even though the internet and process...
10 years ago
The National Library of Virtual Manipulatives, which we reviewed last week, contains a good simulation for Conway's Game of Life. The game of life - created by British mathematician John Conway around 1970 — is an example of a particular type of computation called a cellular automaton. It works like this: a rectangular grid is drawn up, and each square on the grid is marked as either alive or dead. After one turn (or generation as it's commonly called), some of the dead cells spring to life, and some of t...
edLab Review: National Library of Virtual Manipulatives editor: Max Sklar The NLVM is a large set of simple online apps designed to supplement material in math classrooms from K through 12. These Java applets were built over a long period of time at Utah State University (funded by the NSF), with development starting in 1999 and updates all the way through 2008. They divide the applications into 5 categories of learning: Numbers/Operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Data Analysis/Probability. For more on our ratings, download our rubric [Pros] Variety of topics; highly educational; easy to get started [Cons] Minor flaws in user interface [The Bottom Line] Great for supplementing math lessons; read directions
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10 years ago
In my last post about general AI, I described Solomonoff Induction (with a more detailed description in Shane Legg's videos), which theoretically creates the most intelligent machine possible. Such a machine cannot be built because it requires knowledge of Kolmogorov Complexity, which is not computable. So, time to give up and go home? Not so fast! The Kolmogorov Complexity is actually known for the simple mathematical formulas, and research in theoretical mathematics and computer science can give us better and better approximations for the Kolmogorov Complexity of more and more hypothes...
10 years ago
In this lecture, Dr. Legg sketches out how a general AI could be built. It starts with the idea of using Bayesian Statistics. The idea is to construct a "prior...
10 years ago
I caught this excellent lecture from last year by Shane Legg, who discusses the future of "intelligent" machines. He goes into some good technical discussions, but there's also discussion for a general audience as well. I'm going to summarize a few takeaways, and then supplement them with some of my own thoughts and reactions. First, Dr. Legg attempts to give a general definition for intelligence, which is not an easy thing to do. Intelligence is not the same as consciousness - which is fortunate because consciousness is even mor...