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10 years ago
Teachers College Record Author and Voice subject Marybeth Gasman is offering advice on HBCUs in the Times.
10 years ago
This story in the New York Times describes the work of Dorothy Jane Mills, the wife of noted baseball historian Dr. Harold Seymour. While Seymour is widely recognized for his contribution to sports scholarship and history, the work of Mills is not. She was an unacknowledged co-author on Seymour's projects, and she is just now getting credit for her work. While this story is certainly very interesting in its own right, it also points to what I imagine to be a much bigger story. How many works of ...
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10 years ago
The Chronicle ran piece on running meetings, and while reading it, all I could think about is how much further along our thinking on meetings is at the Lab. Maybe the Chronicle would like a submission on our process?
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The New York Times homepage is currently featuring a story on the educational historian Diane Ravitch. While it is exciting to see educational news featured so prominently, after reading the article I don't have a strong sense of what is at stake. I understand that Ravitch left some of the organizations that she was once affiliated with, and I understand that she is questioning some of her own positions. But, I do not understand the significance of this. Instead of articulating what positions Ravitch held and wh...
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10 years ago
What might happen if newspapers went away? Bob McChesney and John Nichols paint a bleak picture of an America without papers, and argue that the government should subsidize journalism.
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In this engaging editorial by Errol Morris, the filmmaker explores how photography is used to present complicated situations. At one point in the essay, Morris describes the propensity towards conspiracy that many of us develop in response to complicated situations. Morris states: "Conspiracies are what people turn to when they don't want to bother with more complex explanations. They are usually the product of not wanting to think about why things happened." This quotation reminded me of Isaiah Berlin's interest in a line from C.I. Lewis, who writes, "There is no a priori reason for thinking that, when we discover the truth, it will prove interesting." I put these two quotations together because I think they are a good reminder that though problems in education are complex, the solutions to these complex problems may prove uninteresting. If this way of thinking is accurate, I think it has implications for educational documentaries.
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10 years ago
In the digital age, what happens when you want to distance yourself from your past self? How can you create a space to change, when your identity online is fixed? Should news organizations take stories down when the subject of the story makes a request? "On the Media" this weekend was very good on these questions. While it seems that individuals do not have the freedom to change their online identities, what about corporations and television shows like
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Pollyanna--for those of you who don't know her, she helped me do EdLab recruiting last year--recently sent me in the direction of this internship posting. What do you think? Is the tone/substance a good fit for something that we might want to experiment with?
While reading Professor Rosaen's recent paper on using video as a means to making teachers more reflective, I came across this paper that discusses the strengths and limitations of current video annotation tools–including VITAL–as they apply to education. It looks like there is certainly room for Critter to fill (what is slowly becoming) a fairly well-defined need.
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10 years ago
This student video is definitely worth a look for anyone following the Ruby Payne debate (see, for example: Bomer et al., (Payne's response), Gorski, (Payne's response), Ng & Rury, (Payne's response), a...
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