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Ariela Robinson has a passion for fusing art and literature. In fact, she researches the intersection of the two fields as a doctoral candidate in the interdisciplinary program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Also a high school English teacher for the past 10 years, Robinson has regularly asked her students to create pieces of art based on books they study together. Robinson’s most recent student showcase took place in the
The phrase big data has a somewhat intimidating presence in educational settings. Teachers and school leaders feel increasingly pressured to take up data analytic practices without being entirely equipped for this new facet of education. To confront this issue, a recent event in the Smith Learning Theater, the Education Leadership Data Ana...
The number of times a student highlights a page or how many hours before a test that student chooses to review notes might not look like much to most professors. But to Phil Winne, it’s data. Winne is a professor in the faculty of education at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada ...
When Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey first founded the Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts dojo, its focus was teaching self-defense to women and girls and the year was 1974. The 80s not only saw BWMA find a permanent location in Park Slope but also the addition of classes to specifically support women of color and those with disabilities. The organization was renamed the Center for Anti-Violence Education in the 1990s...
The middle and high school history curriculum in the US does little to address black history and culture outside of offering a unit on slavery or the civil rights movement. And because they can’t see themselves in it, many African American students encounter obstacles when it comes to truly connecting with the material and developing a love of history. Th...
This past April, the Smith Learning Theater hosted a workshop on the challenges and opportunities faced by teachers in refugee contexts. The interactive design workshop, called Communities of Practice: Teachers in Conflict and Displacement, was open to graduate students at Teachers College. At the event, students engaged in design activities geared towards thinking through issues regarding child protection, peda...
For decades, it has been man’s mission to walk on Mars, and the Smith Learning Theater finally accomplished this herculean task. The Out of This World Learning Experience took participants from the fourth floor of the Teachers College library to the faraway surface of the mysterious red planet in an interactive theatrical phantasmagoria both educational and awe-inspiring. The EdLab team manned the two-hour exped...
From Interactive Telecommunications Program graduate to MediaLab director at the Metropolitan Museum of Art to current research fellow at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation and adjunct professor at the Anthropology School , Marco Castro Cosio has an extensive history with collaborative innovation and play in the l...
During the summer of ‘72, the entire country and really, the whole world was chess crazy. American grandmaster, Bobby Fischer had just defeated USSR Champion Boris Spassky in the World Chess Championship during the height of the Cold War and the search began for the next great chess player. An all-male chess club was developed with this very hope in mind, but over time the program shifted its sights toward equitable opportunities for both young men and wo...
Elementary and middle school teachers are often struggling to find ways to foster a true interest in science in their classrooms. The answer? Killer snails! Not only are killer snails a fascinating predator from the deep but it is also the name of a brand new creator of science games that inspires a love of science in users of all ages.