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There's been a lot of talk and criticism around the K-12 Education Reform program in the Philippines, namely around the decision to extend the curriculum by 2-years and the resulting organizational wave this will cause. School administrators and teachers are rightly worried about huge gaps in enrollment and the stretching of a curriculum that perhaps should have been r...
For most non-profit schools, finding a good college for students does not begin until the 11th grade. According to this New York Times article, however, Avenues and Leman Manhattan (two for-profit schools) are starting the college hunt during freshman year. This practice raises several questions: Should high students start looking at colleges earlier then the 11th grade? Should the entire four years of high school be devoted to getting students into college? Should student start worrying about the admission process, and the chances of getting into the college of their choice, much earlier? One argument for starting the process in the 9th grade is that it allows students to start thinking about how to fill college applications with things like extracurricular activities. It can also allow students to think about what they would like to major in, and what career path they would like to follow. If students have a better idea of their career path, it may lower the number who are in college for more than the usual four years due to switching majors. This can help keep the student loan debt as low as possible. On the flip side of the coin, some people believe that starting the process earlier would put more pressure on students to perform well and it may overwhelm students. So after reading about both sides of the issue, when do you think the right time is to start the college application process? Will starting earlier necessarily increase the number of students going into college right after high school? Should students focus more on the process or their studies? These are just some of the questions we should be answering as we follow this new trending educational practice.
The subject of the extraordinarily high number of higher education students enrolled in remedial classes has come up before on the blog, but some research out of Teachers College's Community College Research Center puts the whole thing in a new light.
The New York Times gives a report of how colleges and universities are finally realizing that we're still in a deep recession, and that they would need to change and enhance their programs in order to prepare students for the new job market. This has led to a potentially beneficial trend where colleges and universities are adding programs like “global sustainability” which teaches students about renewable energy and green marketing. This is just an example of how colleges are changing their programs so that they are more focused and market-driven. This demonstrates how college has evolved from an experience to learn and explore different subjects to a 4 year training period for your future job. Of course, a story about education wouldn't be complete without talking about the political and business influences that are pressuring schools. For example, continuing education programs teach students the necessary skills to make them viable candidates in the job market. It also helps them to keep their skills sharp. This continuing education deal allows students to get certifications for their new skills without receiving formal academic credits or degrees. It seems that we are trying so desperately to lower the unemployment rate and keep jobs from going overseas; colleges are making it easier now for anyone to get the proper training for a job and are cutting the time it takes to get that training. Is this necessarily a good thing?
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Here is Bill Gates, in the New York Times, trying to put the brakes on incipient overuse of new and fancy teacher evaluation metrics. Gates has been a powerful (measured at least in millions of dollars) and effective voice for education reform for a while now, and although he's often criticized for the specific policies he pushes, at least he's willing to change his mind, as he did on the issue of small class sizes. Gates, responding to recent efforts in New York and elsewhere to publicize teacher...
The New York Times, along with other media outlets, reports that the Supreme Court is returning to the issue of affirmative action in higher education, which might result in preventing or restricting colleges and universities from considering race and ethnicity in the college admission process. Of course, this would be a huge disappointme...
What does it take to create the educational video game of the future? Props if you guessed a successful gaming startup, data and software from the Millennium Institute, Facebook, Swiss angel investors, and a million dollars. ...
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The New York Times' popular “Schoolbook” blog reports that last night, after an all-night negotiating session and cutting it very close to the deadline, the New York State teachers union and education officials reached a compromise for a new statewide teacher evaluation system. The rush was, of course, so that the state could implement a teacher evaluation system before losing millions of dollars in federal money as part of the Race to the Top program.
Digital publishing is something of a changing neighborhood, but recently the level of hostility has escalated noticeably. Last week Penguin terminated its contract with mega library content provider Overdrive over clashes with Overdrive's Kindle lending agreement. T...
The citation network has long been held as a metric for measuring the impact of scholarly literature, but with readers today far likelier to tweet than cite, new practices have developed to track clout on the web. These methods, called altmetrics, measure the network of references from Twitter and blogs to