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As we look for some great tools for the Learning Theater, we might want to consider RapID, a low latency rfid framework developed by Disney Research and Carnegie Mellon. The framework is described in a technical paper and demonstrated in the video below.
Since Amazon launched their cloud computing business AWS ("Amazon Web Services") in 2006 they have been striving to broaden and deepen their offerings. By broadening I mean allowing greater and greater access to the cloud whether that is geographically, or from an ever increasing range of devices. By deepening I mean allowing for a greater complexity of services provided. This has been part of their strategy to become the premier cloud computing company. It's safe to say (for better or for worse) that Amazon has succeeded in their strategy. This year's ...
I've done a little fun homework using BeautifulSoup to scrape our Edlab blog up to page 50 and decide who has the most comments around. Snapshot of all Edlabbers and number of comments for public posts (not counting private ones) You can read more and see the script on my Medium blog or ask for your number of comments from me. This technique can be used i...
Want to beat the hackers at their own game, learn various vulnerabilities as a web designer and developer or just learn how to protect yourself as a user? Try Google Gruyere, a web application intentionally created with all the vulnerabilities such as Cross-site Scripting (XSS), Cross-site Forgery (XSF), Denial of Service (DoS) and many more for anyone to hack in and break LEGALLY! Each instance of Gruyere web app is generated for each user, ...
I came across this video about a robotic pet that Sony released in Japan, which has now been discontinued. It is a really poignant topic-robots as companions, and this video honestly disturbed me. I feel like I am seeing more and more real-life derivatives of the plot from the movie Her. I think that as fun and novel as robots can be when they are given lifelike qualities, it is important to separate artificial from real when it comes to companionship and emotional bonds, or we risk a world of ersatz relationships. Check out the vi...
I wanted to share this amazing project I saw on the Wired Blog called 20 Steps. It reminds me of Xu Bing's Phoenix.
As I was perusing technology and education related videos for possible Vialogue pitches, I came across this video of a motion sensor Google is developing. I wanted to share it here since I don't think it is quite under the category of Vialogues (or maybe it is?). Anyway, I think that this continues to add to public fears of privacy invasion. Radio waves can trap the motions of your hand, but where is this information going? Who has access to it? Also, I wonder why if you are using your fingers to push an imaginary button or raise volume on something, why not just press an old fashioned button ...
These are some outputs from an Arduino after I read it via serial. It is equivalent to "Hello, I'm fine and ready!" The repetition of the output almost made a 3D Ascii art that I thought was nice. Accidentally nice.
Here's a really interesting article from WIRED about why Google Cardboard, while small and affordable, is a major player in VR. “'It’s an attractive outlet for developer community engagement,” says Ryan Martin of 451 Research. “For Google it’s a low-risk way to see what kinds of applications people are keen to create, and then just as importantly keen to consume.'"