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8 years ago
While searching and printing newspaper headlines for this morning's Cafe News, a daily exhibit displayed in our library's cafe, I discovered the following news item across multiple papers (in multiple countries), though this particularly clever headline hails from London's The Times: “Search me: Facebook Prepares to Give Google a Poke.” Facebook announced yesterday its plans to unveil a search feature within its own compiled data. Akin, perhaps, to how Google Plus allows personalized searches on the internet, Facebook's search function will allow users to mine their controversially comp...
8 years ago
Today, on Facebook, I found an article Steve Coll wrote back in May about leaving Facebook. I have to admit that at first glance I thought it was a new article, because I read it immediately upon waking up, and because we had run out of coffee in our home. Reading “the news” from the “friends” whose thoughts I “subscribe to” is like that--breaking news often turns out to be months old. What struck me most about the article is that Coll, who whose books include The Bin Ladens and Ghost Wars, thought to write about Facebook at all. (The answer to that question is he has a new book, Private Empi...
Today Yudan and I participated in a live radio chat at Big Data Republic called “Locking Up Your Cloud: Security in the Ether”. The focus of the conversation was (as the name suggests) on best security practices to observe when migrating data to the cloud. The conversation did not provide any life changing revelations; it was mostly a checklist of what to consider when migrating to the clout. But there were several points that were brought up which we should keep in mind as we continue moving our data into the cloud. Here's the highlights.
Big Data Republic is holding a radio event that is focused on cloud security. They are also giving out Starbucks Cards for free. See here for details.
A friend of mine sent me this New York Times piece which does a beautiful job of integrating multimedia. The movies and slides feel like part of the experience rather than additional content. Check it out on an HTML 5 supported browser.
While doing research for a library school paper, I stumbled upon the American Association of School Libraries (AASL)'s Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning. Included in their list is the EdLab's very own Vialouges! I've been playing around with some of the other sites, especially Stixy.com - a note-taking website that organizing your notes like a bulletin board. You can see one of my Stixy boards here (where I've organized the research for the o...
During my weekly sifting of MindShift, I came across this blog (albeit, a bit older) on the increasing trend of educational apps (specifically on the Ipad). This blog from MindShift details some pretty interesting statistics that I thought I would share. The list below are not all of the stats listed, but ones that I thought were interesting take aways from the blog, and something to keep in mind when developing EdLab educational apps. Over 80% of ...
8 years ago
The internet is all a-buzz about the kickstarter project for OUYA, which not only surpassed its goal of $950,000 in one day, but today (day 3) is about the cross the $4,000,000 mark. So what's OYUA, and why have 55,000 people already spent $99 for one less than 24 hours after learning it exists (for the record it won't actually be released until March of 2013). In the simplest terms OUYA is a video game console, but it's really something much bigger. OUYA intends to bring console games back into a market that they claim is being ruined by smartphones and tablets. From the kickstarter page: The console market is pushing developers away. We've seen a brain drain: some of the best, most creative gamemakers are focused on mobile and social games because those platforms are more developer-friendly. And the ones who remain focused on console games can't be as creative as they'd like. The idea behind OUYA is to allow anyone to develop games (every console includes development kit), and to always offer at least a part of every game for free. The entire system runs on Android which means there is already a community of developers for the system, but founder Julie Uhrman is adamant that the system is not just for ports of existing mobile games. She insists that the system will have it's own ecosystem of games, and considering the overwhelming support that the project has already found, it seems she's right. Click "read more" to see their video.
I came across an interesting revision of the MVC framework, breaking the Contoller into Operations and Events (MOVE). It seems logical enough, but I wonder what you developers think. Is the Controller becoming too unwieldy for good object-oriented design?
I just read on Inside Higher Ed about an experimental social learning component that Stanford is adding to one of their most popular iTunes U courses (iPad and iPhone Application Development). They are using the platform Piazza, which Megha reviewed on the EdLab blog last summer...