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Why are faculty unenthusiastic about almost all learning management systems? Check out this thorough description of the limitations of such systems.
I am always on the look out for new ways teachers can incorporate technology into the classroom, but how much technology is too much? Brian actually showed me a video today (you can watch it here) about this robot teacher in Japan, and we both agreed that this isn't where we saw the future of education to be. Not only would the students focus on the robot itself more than the material they should be learning, there is also no way the robot can build relationships with the st...
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7 years ago
In this session, Paul Irish introduced a few tools and techniques he's been using for JavaScript developing. The first tool introduced by Paul is SASS (Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets). SASS is an extension of CSS3, adding nested rules, variables, mixins, selector inheritance and more. It's translated to well-formatted, standard CSS using the command line tool or a web-framework plugin. Per the above definition, SASS is pretty close to LESS, the tool EdLab developers have been using. However, SASS does provide some unique features that makes it...
7 years ago
This is directed toward journalists who are afraid of code (many of us are :) and was produced by the student newsroom at ONA 12 but it is a wonderful interactive+video to play with for any newbies and so adorably done. Check it here: Eliminate your fear of code!
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In light of a blog post by Scott K. arguing the value of teaching mathematics in high school, I decided to browse the NY Times Education section, and found this interesting opinion piece . The writer basically describes that evaluation of teachers and students rely too much on standardized testing. She writes that there should not be such high-stake accountability on tests that are often "erratic" and "inherently unreliable". Instead, she argues that ...
8 years ago
As suggested by Hui Soo, I just read an article that discusses how educators can be innovative even when modern education tools are not available. It points out that being innovative shoudn't be just about letting student use modern learning resources because many school still lack them. It's possible though to be innovative even with limited resources. The author gave a very good example about how a teacher can use Twitter to learn othe...
9 years ago
Hey, it's really easy to learn with augmented reality.
Like most good physics teachers, Diana Hall has a deep respect for the importance of the experimental method in science education. What sets Hall apart, however, is that her commitment to bringing engaging lab work to eager students has taken her atop mountains, over seas, and into a community that would otherwise lack the resources to set up even the most basic labs for its students. In February 2011, Hall started "Do Science Tanzania," a project to share teaching strategies and equipment with science teachers in Moshi, Tanzania. According to the project
The New York Times published a recent article criticizing New York City's push to pay teachers based on value-added. While the article could have been more informative, its overall point that value-added is highly imperfect system seems valid. A line from one of my favorite edublogs, The Quick & The Ed, sums it up quite nicely, "Value-added is the worst form of teacher evaluation but it's better than everything else." Here is what I see as the good, the bad, and the ugly of value-added: The Good: Value-added provide...