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Joey Lee gave a good presentation here at Teachers College a few weeks ago and discussed his dissertation, which is a design-based research study of a video game he developed to teach students about the misconceptions facing Asian Americans. He described the problem of having stereotypes forced onto Asian American students as being detrimental to their healthy development, leading to stress, anxiety, and depression. In the design of the game, he came up with some interesting strategies to teach kids about these issues. Reading Judith Warner's blog post over at the Times, I wonder if a similar strategy could be used to deal with the masculinity problem in schools. She describes how concepts of masculinity have shifted little over time and in today's school "to be something other than the narrowest, stupidest sort of guy's guy, is to be unworthy of even being alive." I totally hear her loud and clear: the "gay" label is often attributed in cases where it has nothing to do with homosexuality. I can remember in seventh grade making it a point to count how many times I was called gay (I stopped counting at 50). At this time, this had really nothing to do with homosexuality but rather with the fact of being a goody-goody who made it a point to dress well (a few years later it had a lot more to do with it, but by then no one cared so much). I do wonder if a game could be developed that could teach kids to expand their notions of masculinity. Joey had mentioned that he thought that a similar strategy could be used with women (e.g., women in science), but didn't make an explicit point regarding masculinity. Although Asian men don't often get the "gay" label (for some reason, people will tolerate Asians to be a bit more effeminate), it seems like the problems that Joey describes are fairly similar to the masculinity problems that Warner describes. I might nudge him to take things in this direction....
Six people joined Survey Sidekick table presentation today (which is not bad comparing the turnout at other tables) and gave some useful suggestions for future development of Survey Sidekick: 1. Online consent form: A doctoral student from Australia who is conducting a study of 11-grade students' career choice in Australia mentioned the necessity of designing online consent form for researchers whose projects involve young respondents. 2. Advanced analysis of survey results: Many online survey tools provide descriptive statistics of survey results. However, it would be more useful if...
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As a follow-up to the EdLab seminar on Mobile Devices in the Workplace, there were requests to provide some resources on mobile learning. If there is anything in particular you are looking for, feel free to leave a comment or contact me directly and I will be glad to assist. References A list of references for your use, generated from my dissertation. Mobile articles A del.icio.us site that a colleague and I post mobile-related news articles to. Takeaways Two key takeaways from the seminar (that are independent of your topic): 1 - Know your audience This can help with anything from designing relevant solutions to gathering useful feedback. If you know your audience, your chances of succeeding at a task exponentially increase. 2 - Focus on improving a process Many times, there is an idea that technology will improve a process. For example, "let's get everybody iPhone's and they'll learn better!" The focus should be on identifying a process deficiency and how this can be improved. Technology is often an answer to help improve a process. So, focus on improving the process first and the rest will come. Slides Also, the presentation slides: Mobile Devices In The Workplace Nabeel
11 years ago
I've got "Let The Sun Shine" running through my head this week, 'cos I saw the musical Hair last Friday. The current run on Broadway (previously in Central Park last summer) looks like a response to the governmental climate of secrecy and belligerence from the previous eight years, and the musical ends (no spoilers, I hope!) with the image of a young soldier lying dead on an American flag. It echoes an image we have not been allowed to see throughout the recent war: flag-wrapped caskets returning from the Middle East. Only recently have efforts to get those photos released been successful. ...
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Hello Edlabbers, As you may very well be aware (maybe?), one of the newest series this season (with working titles such as "The Catalyst" or "The Graduate") will focus on alumni of Teachers College who may be flying under the radar of the Alumni Office, yet are making great strides and changes in their field of expertise. They may be and probably will be harder to locate, as these people will most likely have what could be termed as "looser" ties to TC. We are looking for those alumni who are out in the field, leading rich and innovative careers/lives. This season our focus will be on tho...
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In the process of kicking around ideas for a new series on After Ed (2.0...details coming at our seminar next week!) We've had a few education-focused organizations, people, activists and gurus on our radar. The list includes Once Upon a School, the TED wish of Dave Eggers, explained in short form here:
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Barn Raisers. That is the demographic that we can thank for the election of Barack Obama to the Office of the President. So what is a Barn Raiser you ask? Check out this article from Business Week to find out. The piece titled, "What Data Crunchers Did for Obama" underscores the central role that data and microtargeting played in the Obama campaign. In that vein, EdLab's Development & Research team has been working to figure out how to use data mining techniques to learn more about learner behaviors...
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11 years ago
I was going through the link sent by Hui Soo for the Web Analytics Association seminar and stumbled upon this interesting presentation given by Eric at the WAA group. It gives an insight of what is web analytics and how one can incorporate it in the organization to reap the benefits. http://fundfindr.tv/265.html Let me know your thoughts after watching this.
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11 years ago
A pretty funny concept.
Related to some previous, recent posts on the blog the Chronicle of Higher Education today has a piece on a report released by Association of Research Libraries and the Ithaka group on scholarly resources and new models of publishing.