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Hi everyone, Rebekah and I have been brainstorming ideas for a research project proposal in hopes of presenting a poster at the 2010 AERA Conference. If you have a moment, please reply to our online poll with the topic you like best: Which Proposal Idea for the AERA Conference Do You Like Best?(trends) T...
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Since everyone else is talking about TCETC 2009', I thought I would include my PPT from the presentation my colleague Caron and I gave, on Designing an Online Social Network: Lessons Learned. Designing an Online Social Network: Lessons LearnedView more presentations from ac2182.
Last Saturday I had the opportunity to attend the 'Project New Media Literacies' conference at MIT. The event was part conference, part professional development and ALL PR and outreach for MIT's Project NML in the Comparative Media Studies department. More specifically they wanted to plug their new tool, The Learning Library.
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*This little essay has been sitting in a Google doc for months now - I'd completely forgotten to share it. Since tomorrow's EdLab Seminar focuses on the Scratch programming environment, I thought I'd wipe the dust off of this short reflection on a month that I spent creating a new Scratch program every day. I called the project "Scratch-a-day."* I like to think of myself as a creator. My approach to education, art, and techno...
In my defense yesterday, Lalitha Vasudevan mentioned Mike Wesch, a cultural anthropologist at Kansas State. He has a number of videos he's made, some of which I have seen, but I have never heard him talk about his research. Here is one presentation he delivered at the Library of Congress which I find quite fascinating, and surprised I hadn't seen before (so if you have, just ignore me). He gives an anthropological introduction to YouTube, and defines the community he is studying as the YouTube community. It is very interesting to see him do this, especially since my experience with "participant observation" here at TC has been about "place," and by this physical location was meant. This was kind of frustrating for me because it seemed to ignore the way in which many people actually live these days (one's physical space may not be the most meaningful place for some people). He also really effectively uses the video to illustrate what he is saying. Check it out:
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10 years ago
Maximizing the Democratic Potential of Schools as Ideologically Diverse Public Spaces In this presentation, Hess shared her latest research findings about young people's experience of controversial issue discussion in schools. In a survey of a thousand students, only 31% of the respondents indicated that they talked to people who disagreed with them on public issues. However, even in seemingly homogeneous schools (such as Catholic schools), students and teachers hold diverse perspectives on abortion, death penalty, civil unions, free market system, etc. How teachers in various school contexts create ideological diverse public spaces is the focus of Hess' recent qualitative study.
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10 years ago
In this session, Stephen presented his paper along with two other papers about online learning and teaching environments. Stephen did a great job in this presentation, and participants were especially interested in the cultural factors Stephen brought into the discussion of online learning environment (e.g. creating a competitive climate/task in online learning environment helps to engage Ghanaian students in online learning) Stephen has blogged about this session earlier . Here are some other points I learned from this session:
Joey Lee gave a good presentation here at Teachers College a few weeks ago and discussed his dissertation, which is a design-based research study of a video game he developed to teach students about the misconceptions facing Asian Americans. He described the problem of having stereotypes forced onto Asian American students as being detrimental to their healthy development, leading to stress, anxiety, and depression. In the design of the game, he came up with some interesting strategies to teach kids about these issues. Reading Judith Warner's blog post over at the Times, I wonder if a similar strategy could be used to deal with the masculinity problem in schools. She describes how concepts of masculinity have shifted little over time and in today's school "to be something other than the narrowest, stupidest sort of guy's guy, is to be unworthy of even being alive." I totally hear her loud and clear: the "gay" label is often attributed in cases where it has nothing to do with homosexuality. I can remember in seventh grade making it a point to count how many times I was called gay (I stopped counting at 50). At this time, this had really nothing to do with homosexuality but rather with the fact of being a goody-goody who made it a point to dress well (a few years later it had a lot more to do with it, but by then no one cared so much). I do wonder if a game could be developed that could teach kids to expand their notions of masculinity. Joey had mentioned that he thought that a similar strategy could be used with women (e.g., women in science), but didn't make an explicit point regarding masculinity. Although Asian men don't often get the "gay" label (for some reason, people will tolerate Asians to be a bit more effeminate), it seems like the problems that Joey describes are fairly similar to the masculinity problems that Warner describes. I might nudge him to take things in this direction....
Six people joined Survey Sidekick table presentation today (which is not bad comparing the turnout at other tables) and gave some useful suggestions for future development of Survey Sidekick: 1. Online consent form: A doctoral student from Australia who is conducting a study of 11-grade students' career choice in Australia mentioned the necessity of designing online consent form for researchers whose projects involve young respondents. 2. Advanced analysis of survey results: Many online survey tools provide descriptive statistics of survey results. However, it would be more useful if...
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As a follow-up to the EdLab seminar on Mobile Devices in the Workplace, there were requests to provide some resources on mobile learning. If there is anything in particular you are looking for, feel free to leave a comment or contact me directly and I will be glad to assist. References A list of references for your use, generated from my dissertation. Mobile articles A del.icio.us site that a colleague and I post mobile-related news articles to. Takeaways Two key takeaways from the seminar (that are independent of your topic): 1 - Know your audience This can help with anything from designing relevant solutions to gathering useful feedback. If you know your audience, your chances of succeeding at a task exponentially increase. 2 - Focus on improving a process Many times, there is an idea that technology will improve a process. For example, "let's get everybody iPhone's and they'll learn better!" The focus should be on identifying a process deficiency and how this can be improved. Technology is often an answer to help improve a process. So, focus on improving the process first and the rest will come. Slides Also, the presentation slides: Mobile Devices In The Workplace Nabeel