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Occasionally during our academic research efforts, we come across "orphaned works," i.e. copyrighted material where it is difficult or impossible to contact the copyright holder for permission. This is particularly relevant given our use of online search tools and digitized resources. With no central database of copyright-holders, this situation can arise for many reasons including works published anonymously, the author information has been lost over time, the chain of IP ownership has become unclear or the work may have never been traditionally published at all. If you are interested in learning more about proposed legislation and the proper use of orphaned works, there is an event Tuesday, October 20, 2009, from 6 PM - 8 PM entitled, "Lost & Found: A Practical Look at Orphan Works Legislation", co-sponsored by the Art Law Committee and the Copyright and Literary Property Committee of the New York City Bar Association, in conjunction with Columbia Law School's Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts. The location of the event is the New York Bar Association, 42 West 44th Street New York, NY 10036. The panel discussion will be moderated by June M. Besek, Executive Director, Columbia Law School's Kernochan Center. Issues to be discussed include: How should the law treat “orphan works”? What should be the obligations of potential users with respect to searching for copyright owners? How should infringement claims be handled if a copyright owner emerges? Do different types of copyrighted works present unique issues? What roles might registries and recognition and detection technologies play? More background on the Copyright Act of 1976 and orphaned works after the jump.
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While reading Professor Rosaen's recent paper on using video as a means to making teachers more reflective, I came across this paper that discusses the strengths and limitations of current video annotation tools–including VITAL–as they apply to education. It looks like there is certainly room for Critter to fill (what is slowly becoming) a fairly well-defined need.
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In designing an adaptive learning tool, a learner's learning style is one of the more important factors and I found a video of an interview with Richard Felder in California State University. I am sure that theories of learning style are pretty much familiar with you and there are many related webpages, but in the video, he summarizes this concept pretty neatly, not discursively. I hope to share this with those who are interested in designing learning tools throughout school curriculum or who try to implement it via technologies.
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According to the Times Asus, the comapny responsible for the first netbooks, will venture into the E-Reader market. The article claims Asus will create a full color and more versatile E-Reader. I am not sure what "more versatile" means but I could see Asus basing the E-Reader's OS on the Linux Kernel or just using a version of Ubuntu, which they do with their EEE-PC netbooks. An Open Source E-Reader would allow other developers to create reader software, something that will surely make th...
10 years ago
Last week, Hui Soo blogged about a recent report of online education in the U.S. I think the conceptual framework of online learning used in this report is a great matrix for the design of any online mini courses. The framework considers three dimension of online learning: (a) whether the activity ser...
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Recently I was trying to create account(s) in NetPosse and testing its features. I really like its simple design and think it will be a very powerful tool for community building and social networking in the Teachers College community. Here are some other thoughts on how to make it more powerful: There are two main aspects of social networking tools: 1) people search and 2) building or maintaining relationship through online interactions. While the original version states NetPosse as a social networking application in general, I notice the updated version Jeannie demonstrated yesterday has ...
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10 years ago
So! Heading out from EdLab, last official day of residency. It's been great to be able to be here, and I feel very happy about the work that I've been able to put in on the Ashley project. I'm happy to have a working version of it, and look forward to the possibility of installing it at the library this academic year. I'll probably still putter around with it a bit, tune it up a bit, before it ends up running on a terminal near you. Someone (Carl Goodman, actually) paraphrased Love Story and said, "Digital art means never having to say you're finished." That might not be strictly t...
10 years ago
Some of my colleagues are currently trying out some social networking platforms for educational purposes. I found these articles providing empirical evidence and useful insights on how social networking software can be used for education. Selwyn, N. (2007) ‘‘Screw Blackboard... do it on Facebook!': an investigation of students' educational use of Facebook' Based on an analysis of 68,169 wall postings (4% of these po...
After presenting my EDAR project today, I was thinking a bit about the cult of tools: "This project would be more cool if it ran on the iPhone." Or streamed through a browser. Or used the Cocoa API. All these possibilities make me cringe. Partially for quite pragmatic reasons: I know how much darn time I spent making a working project which happens not to run on the iPhone or a web browser. The host of nasty problems which would arise on one of these platforms freaks me out. It is silly to use a newfangled tool when the extant ones work just fine. But moreso, I fear becoming a serv...
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“I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will be statisticians.” Hal Varian, chief economist at Google. Check out this piece from the NY Times about the growing importance of data and the tools/systems/people that collect, mine, analyze, and interpret the data. Some highlights: In field after field, computing and the Web are creating new realms of data to explore – sensor signals, surveillance tapes, social network chatter, public records and more. “We're rapidly entering a w...
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