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13 years ago
This article reports some of the findings from a 20 year study of pundit’s predications. The author argues that a successful pundit is not the pundit who makes the most successful predictions. Instead, the most successful pundit is the most sensational one. What lessons does this have for educational research? Would we rather read the article that makes a grand prediction and solves all of the world’s problems, or the article that recognizes small flaws and makes minor suggestions?
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The Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) World Fire Atlas (WFA) provides near-real time data about fires burning across the Earth's surface (You have to register to access the data and maps). According to Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Tennessee, the ATSR WFA is an "excellent resource that provides a glimpse of the world that was not previously possible, and which is certain to allow ecologists to address both new and old questions regarding the role of fire in structuring the natural world." What, if ...
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According to this story in the Taipei Times the Chinese search engine company Baidu.com is launching an online encyclopedia that imitates Wikipedia. Wikipedia itself is blocked by Chinese censors, and the new Baidu encyclopedia will not permit users to add entries without review.
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13 years ago
The founder of Insideschools.org was named one of the most important New Yorkers concerned about education in New York Magazine (as you will notice, there are no TC people on the list (Michael Rebell made the list for law).  Why is this site so important? Why do they have such a high p...
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Changing Universities with ICT For those of you like me who monitor what is happening globally with e-Learning – virtual worlds have no borders – you may want to read how the University of Botswana is running a project on mobile technologies in Africa. The Universities Computer Science department recently won a Microsoft Research Grant for its healthcare information mobile tech system. The researchers will explore how the latest wireless and mobile technologies may help under-served communities so that they can receive health care information and education via the Internet. The Univer...
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I would like to know what others think about the recent redesign of the New York Times website. From a quick look, it seems to me that the new site presents a good deal more information on each page in part through a new layout and in part by using the entire width of the screen. The site also offers more views of the same material so readers bump into more things in more ways. Finally, the site puts video in a more prominent place that appears to be a permanent feature of the paper's approach to online publishing.
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A new report on The Internet's Growing Role in Life's Major Moments from the Pew Internet and American Life Project shows the growing importance of the internet as a source of information for those making major educational decisions. In 2002 14 million Americans reported that the internet was crucial in terms of getting additional training for a career; in 2005 this figure rose to 21 million. In 2002 12 million Americans reported that the internet was crucial in choosing a school or college for themselves or a child; in ...
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A new project detailed in an article in Business Week will experiment with bringing out new books in five formats simultaneously. The formats are: 1) the traditional hardcover book, 2) the e-book for use with e-book readers, 3) an audio book, 4) a print-on-demand book, and 5) chapters and other parts of a book available through print-on-demand or online. The simultaneous multiple formats seem like a great advance for readers in general. I hope that the formats include some provision for searching the cont...
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Good news for the visuals! I Just came back from the National Art Education conference in Chicago with great results upon presenting a 3 minute video instead of reading or powerpointing. The sensorial overlaying of a concrete narrative borrowed from Boston Legal (on ABC Tuesdays at ten) with a few words about the struggle of words and visuals in academia bombarding the screen could have not been argued better in this form. Integrating knowledge, inquiry and entretaiment got the audience–department chairs, journal editors and faculty of several programs–interested in reconsidering the possibil...
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Richard A. Lanham, the author of The Economics of Attention: Style and Substance in the Age of Information and The Electronic Word: Democracy, Technology, and the Arts among many other titles, has a very interesting website called Rhetorica. I have not seen a personal/academic/publishing page like this before, but I find it compelling. Further, it is interesting that Lantham [and his wife] made the transition from very traditional academic roles [English at UCLA, Principal Editor at the UCLA Center for Medieval and Re...
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