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Has anyone run across Mambo, an open source content management system? I think that we need a light weight open source replacement for ContentWorks and wonder if this may be a possbility. Take a look and let me know what you think. It does not seem to handle e-commerce so it would not work for TCR or the new library website and store, but it might work for the TESOL journal and some other publishing efforts.
Cool website I came across @ Stanford: http://mediax.stanford.edu/flash/home.html
At tomorrow's edLab seminar scheduled for noon, we are going to undertake a guided group ideation session about the problems facing "academic knowledge workers". The "guided" part of the ideation session stems from the attached document, which represents work that Gary and I have done to this point. It would be helpful if you have time to read the document ahead of time. In general, we are seeking to accomplish the following in terms of the attached document: * expand upon ideas already present * add new ideas that are missing * debate removing ideas that might be mispl...
Our recent discussion of alternative approaches to developing and sharing knowledge are well illustrated in an article from the Stanford Magazine entitled Sound Advice in which two different music advice systems are described. One system relies on user generated information; the other relies on a team of experts.
Hui Soo and I have been having some conversations about how Edlab might approach the task of creating a new school for a new era. This prompts the question of what exactly we mean by the concept of school in light of our focus on learning and the extension of quality learning opportunities. So, let me start with a minimal definition of school as "an environment optimized for learning." There may well be more elements to a full definition of school, and I invite others to add to this definition. In approaching the construction of a full definition, it seems important to distinguish between ...
--After, some informal conversations, some necessary reflections about my ‘academic' visions, and inevitable eavesdropping, I would like to share the core ideas of an introductory text-insert from a dvd compilation titled Dynamic Documents from Art.-- DYNAMIC DOCUMENTS: gadgets, artifacts and other object hypothesis. It seems more accurate to view thought and experience as occurring behind or beneath spoken words, as being something that saying helps to adumbrate and communicate and that writing (or rewriting) falsifies to the extent that it turns the natural products of mentation–fluid...
Here is a model for a possible Gottesman educational event
Refelcting on how food affects the seminar's dynamics (interfering with our cognitive load as we are loading our bellies) I have some suggestions that even draw on some issues facing american eating habits. The quality of the food at Kichennette is undeniable. The size of the sandwiches "jaw breaker" and the buffet style setting does not work for a seminar dynamic. The brown bag, airplante food tray, frozen dinners are examples to be considered. Based on these premisses I suggest: - A "negotiontion", as regular customers, with Kichennette ( or any other local food supplier, I also know...
I was just re-reading a discussion from June -- Lin, Gary, Brian -- on browsing and serendipity. The opera house was very impressive, especially the tennis balls. How do museums preserve special exhibits after they've been taken down? Since so much of the experience is spacial, have they already figured out a way to capture physical spaces that allow online visitors to stumble around the exhibit and randomly look at stuff?
Donald E. Heller, in a memo to the producer of The Scholar, says it's time to get Ph.D. students some visibility. more