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As you all may know, I have been keeping my eye on Second Life as a space for education. For those of you who participated in our Summer 2006 course on the Sociology of Online Learning will recognize both the Harvard and NMC space. Here is an ad for a class this term being offered by Harvard Law School:
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The Dewey decimal system works. But, it works in a three-dimensional world with bookshelves and stairs. In electronic environments, I can move from "philosophy of science" to "the mathematics of sentential logic" or "Jungian psychology" with ease, so long as the connections are well established. In the old world, these connections where physical - adjacent bookshelves or even books; and Dewey made sense of this. In the online environment, these connections are made with tags. Each tag represents a concept, and the number of tags, the degrees of freedom from an event. Maybe it's time to ...
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Check out Amaztype, an interesting interface for finding books. Cool things about it: - uses data Amazon makes available - good for finding random books - "zeitgeist" tool gives a community view It's not such a great interface, but it makes me think more imaginatively about how library website X might function. I like that it generates what are essentially book displays you may find in a Barnes & Noble based on a search term. Questions for development: - How might we use this kind of tool to view TC's archival material? - How could it be even m...
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A company called On Demand Books is now offering a machine that automatically creates books from digital files. A beta version of the machine is operating at World Bank Bookstore. Check out the video demonstration. The actual demonstration begins about 25 minutes into the clip. The question for us is how might we use this ...
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Companies from Nike to Publishers are looking for ways to engage people to build an audience for advertisers. A recent Business Week story includes several interesting models for our consideration. Note that the NY Times new website design has resulted in a 12% increase in traffic.
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What began as a response to Gary's questions about Google caching private content has become a full-blown tutorial. The questions that encourage this post center around maintaining control of content while still having the privilege of search engine support (which is essentially free advertising). For example, how do we let our users find our site with Google, but prevent Google from caching content that should be restricted? Below is a lengthy response to this and other questions in a few sections. It should also serve as a quick and dirty tutorial for those of you who need it.
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Ten years from now, when a scholar lifts her digital pen from the page, where will her article go? There are more than a few possibilities (an academic journal, a vanity site, a digital repository), but a particularly perplexing possibility spans some of these categories: it may go up for sale. Consider the following quote from a recent article: At any rate, I was impressed with Digital Locker's evolution into Your Media Library. (A few months ago I posed the idea that the Digital Locker might be Amazon's secret weapon.) Not only can you pick up digital content there (I purchased a digital article, which was available within seconds), but you can also view all your historical purchases through Amazon and rate them, tag them, review them, and otherwise log your experience. Let's return to our scholar…
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Here is another idea for us to consider as we evolve our next publishing project. Following in the footsteps of Digg, the New Netscape will combine a social bookmarking approach with editorial work from "anchors" who will highlight items for readers. I would like to get some other opinions on this model. In particular, I wonder if this is a service that might be offered by the "World's Largest Education Libary" as part of its effort to inform patrons about developments in the field of education?
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While searching for inspiration for our next publication, I ran across BrookSpeak. Recent stories include: "Religion should be allowed in schools" "American education holds ZERO value" "i-Parent is not student-friendly" If you run across any other thoughtful and insightful high school blogs, I would love to hear about them!
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The Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) World Fire Atlas (WFA) provides near-real time data about fires burning across the Earth's surface (You have to register to access the data and maps). According to Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Tennessee, the ATSR WFA is an "excellent resource that provides a glimpse of the world that was not previously possible, and which is certain to allow ecologists to address both new and old questions regarding the role of fire in structuring the natural world." What, if ...
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