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Making the jump to presenting the news digitally as opposed to in Everett Cafe is no small feat, but it is a very worthwhile one. A morning staple, my preference is to browse papers for stories pertaining to education and libraries. I also enjoy stories about community building and workers, especially combined. Anyone who has worked with me can attest to the fact that I also can't resist a good animal picture. Today's news brings a combination of these trials and triumphs in communities throughout the US, and even a surge in wild animal rescues.
It's not surprising that Drawing in Two Colors or Interpretations of Harlem Jazz pops up when I begin searching for inspirational art or music connected to literature. Winold Reiss' striking lithograph (circa 1920) celebrates African American culture in Harlem, by featuring a man and woman dancing boldly -- most likely in a night club -- African masks and sculptures, bottle, and piano in the background. With his daring combination o...
For this morning news briefing, articles will focus on how states are dealing with COVID-19 in terms of online schooling, in the absentee of social gatherings and celebrations, and traditional educational events. These topics are especially important as we enter a new week of mandatory quarantine; feelings of isolation can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health diseases. Learn how others are learning to cope. If you or anyone you know need mental health and coping strategies during this time period please refer to the
Saturdays are lacking without a trip to the local ASPCA, until it ceases, through much pleading and cajoling by two small children when we acquire a new household companion. One afternoon in the dead of Winter (and absence of household head), Sky slips out of a big brown cardboard box onto our living room carpet, like tumbleweed propelled by a gust of wind across the Mojave. For weeks we fret ove...
The Gottesman Libraries Services Team is pleased to share some headlines in today’s news from the U.S. and around the world with our TC community and friends. As always, our selections are inspired by the Front Pages posted daily on Newseum.org. Today, we’re focusing on education, a topic that in recent days unfortunat...
For this morning news briefing, we’ll be focusing on international stories as the fight against COVID-19 evolves in other countries. This is especially worthy of focus this week as much of the world prepares for Easter this weekend in the face of the continued ravages of the ongoing pandemic. All headlines and stories have been curated from Newseum’s fro...
The Gottesman Libraries Services Team is pleased to share some headlines in today’s news from the U.S. and around the world with our TC community and friends. As always, our selections are inspired by the Front Pages posted daily on Newseum.org. Today, we’re looking at a variety of approaches to the distribution and us...
We invite our TC community and friends to join the Gottesman Libraries Services Team as we share some headlines in today’s news from the U.S. and around the world, inspired by the Front Pages posted daily on Newseum.org
Although it's exact date of origin is unknown, April Fools Day may have started as long ago as April 1, 1582, when France changed from the Julian to Gregorian calendar, an action that purportedly led to the "poisson d'avail" -- the ritual of placing fish on another's back as a symbol of gullibility. In the 1700s, the Scots hunted the "gowk" or cuckoo bird, playfully sending people on silly or fake errands or tasks, while ...
On March 25th, 1911 fire broke out in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory located on the eighth through tenth floors of the Asch building, currently the the landmarked Brown Building of Science, on Washington Place. It was one of the worst industrial fires in our local history -- a tragedy that caused 146 innocent deaths, mostly of women....