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The March Staff Picks collection of books for children and teens about Women and Girls in Sports, on the second floor of the Teachers College Gottesman Libraries, features profiles of outstanding female athletes of the past and present. The athletes include such notables as: sharpshooter Annie Oakley (b. 1860 - d. 1926); basketball player Agnes Morely Cleaveland (b. 1874 - d. 1958); road and track cyclist Tillie Anderson (b. 1875 ...
After Mayor Bill de Blasio’s announcement on Sunday that NYC Public Schools will be closed from now until April 20, the city’s teachers are moving into the largely uncharted territory of reaching students at home. The practice of remote or distance learning is common in higher education and has also been utilized in secondary education environments, but has not been used often with younger...
On March 13th, 1928, American artist, writer, and journalist Gwendolyn Bennett spoke briefly before the NAACP in Philadelphia on the importance of appreciation by African Americans for African art, as well of the work of representatives in the field of modern art. Miss Bennett hoped that we'd cultivate "the viewpoint of looking at art from the creative genius exhibited by the producer." She refe...
A remarkable student is often inspired by a remarkable teacher. While Helen Keller was the first deaf-blind person to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree (and one from Radcliffe College in 1904), she maintained a life-long friendship with her first teacher, Anne Sullivan -- a relationship which is described in Keller's autobiography,
The word "potluck" comes from communal eating traditions. Whether bringing food to a friend on a visit or pooling resources in hard times, the "luck of the pot" provides nourishment for the body, the soul, and the community. The library is a gathering place for everyone. What better way to share who we are and what we do than with a book buffet curated with the "luck" of our catalog? Whether we're seasoned or still a little green, we library staff members part of the Teachers College melting pot to help you expand your information palate. We hope that the books we've brought to the table wi...
Carter Alexander, who was a professor of education and a library professor at Teachers College from 1921 to 1943, is considered to have been a pioneer in education librarianship and in the study of the reference transaction in general. He authored several key education reference works, including Educational Research: Suggestions and Sources of Data with Specific Reference to Administration (published in 1927, with revised editions in 1929 and 1931) and How to Locate Educational Information and Data: A Text and Reference Book (published in 1935, with a revised edition in 19...
The start of the fall semester is a busy time for the acquisitions and materials team at Gottesman Libraries, and the following highlights describe some of the major projects of the fall 2019 semester. In Scarlet Galvan's "More Than Things", she discusses the importance of making visible the often invisible labor associated with serials, technical services, metadata, and electronic resources. I returned to this paper again and again throughout the fall semester, and it's with this paper in mind ...
Did you know that a few years back Teachers College hosted a curated tour of alumna Alma Woodsey Thomas’ exhibition at Studio Museum in Harlem? Alma Thomas (September 22, 1891 – February 24, 1978) was an African-American Expressionist painter and art educator known for her colorful abstr...
She looks up from the dinner table, starring me straight in the eyes, passionately to remark, "My generation is going to pay for the mistakes made by yours!" Sadly I know that my sixteen-year old daughter not only feels the gravity of the situation, but she is right. With champions like
"Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop . . . [s]omehow it was hotter then . . . bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men’s stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps, and by nightfall...