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"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it." --Winston Churchill Each office, faculty member, staff member and student has the opportunity to use PocketKnowledge to create an archive. The goal of an archive is to preserve and make accessible the records that comprise the history of an institution. The archive tells the story of both the organization and the individual. Perhaps the single most important question that each contributor to PocketKnowledge can ask is: How do I want to be remembered? These kinds of records usually add lasting value to an archive: [caption...
"A great deal is said by some people about 'rubbish,' but one investigator's 'rubbish' may be precious to another, and what appears valueless to-day may be found highly important tomorrow." American historian Justin H. Smith (1857-1930) The archives exists to acquire, preserve and make available vital records that document the College. An archive fosters a deeper collective understanding of history through the availability of and research into local archival records. The history of Te...
As a TC intern and future librarian, I spend a fair amount of time looking for things at the library.  It will probably come as no surprise to any of you to find out that TC has an incredible collection of historical children’s literature.  Thinking you too may be curious to see what lives in the closed stacks, I’ve scanned and posted some highlights from our stellar collection. These posts will be (mostly) in chronological order and I'll try to contextualize with fun facts as I find them.  If you are interested in viewing any of these books, you can request them from the closed stacks through...
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="293" caption="Mrs. Meckert's Farm, ca. 1900: The Site of Teachers College"][/caption] Everyone at Teachers College can archive their work with PocketKnowledge (PK), an easy to use institutional archive. This is a great way to make your work part of the ...
Some vintage postcards depicting Teachers College many moons ago were unearthed from some crevice of the 5th Floor and landed on my desk Monday morning. I wanted to share them here, as well as on Pocket Knowledge, TC's digital archive. I love th...
Oh! She came up to College just for fun, But found before her work was done 'T was no loafing place up here. [caption id="" align="alignright" width="202" caption="Dean James Earl Russell"]
"Oh! She came up to College just for fun But found before her work was done T was no loafing place up here. No loafing place up here -- Teachers College"
Building a new library for the rapidly growing college was delayed first by World War I and then again in 1919 by the purchase of the Bancroft apartment building on 121st Street and the Janus Court building on Morningside Drive. Janus Court was renamed in honor of Columbia University president, Seth Low. When plans were resumed in 1922, it was decided to build not only a library but an extension to Grace Dodge Hall for a dining room and restaurant. The library on the south and the Dodge extension on the north would finally enclose the block. The building was named Russell Hall in honor of Jam...
The opening of the Household Arts Building in 1909 marked the professionalization of the field of what was to become Home Economics. The departments of Domestic Arts, Sciences and Administration were combined to form the School of Household Arts and Sciences intended primarily to train teachers of these subjects but also administrators of large domesti...
Teachers College opened the Lincoln School at 646 Park Avenue in 1917 to serve as a laboratory school and a testing ground for progressive curricula. The school encompassed kindergarten through 12th grade and attracted the children of prominent New Yorkers such as John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The staff, under the leadership of Professor Otis W. Caldwell and influenced by the teachings of John Dewey, constructed an interactive or "experience" curriculum designed to relate classroom materials to the realities of everyday urban-industrial as well as agricultural life. Science and mathematics courses ...