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For the EdLab Seminar on Wednesday, October 18th we will be viewing the film Network as a springboard for a discussion of the dimensions of programs and online sites that work to engage an audience. During the viewing we will be juxtaposing the film on one screen with the top online sites of EdLab members on the other screen. To prepare for this part of the seminar we need everyone to post their top ten online sites in comments in response to this blog entry. See you on Wednesday. Please post your top ten online sites even if you cannot atte...
I really enjoyed today's seminar. I think there is something compelling about the entire project, and I believe it is worth our continued attention. One thing that struck me–while reading the list of the recent class of MacArthur Fellows after the talk–was the work of fiction writer George Saunders. Saunder's work often offers descriptions of “a near future where capitalism has run amok. Consumption and the service economy rule the earth.â€? Well...
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The rumor is true...Phil is on YouTube. To view the PK Marketing Commercials follow the links below. I would appreciate it if you could rate the videos and post some of your comments if you have any. Introducing Phil The Pocket On PocketKnowledge with Kelvin Shawn Sealey
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I decided to post some info about the usage of the EdLab site. Here are some fun facts: Over the last day or two, most of our outside traffic came from users on search engines. Makes sense, right? You go on Google, search "future of education" and viola! But what were these users searching for? That cool ringtone that adults can't hear (see it in Hui Soo's blog). After this? Queries about "PHD Comics" (Ian?!) and then a few regarding "Online Learning." (Also a search or two for "Anna Beard!")
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I'd be curious to hear diverse perspectives on the effect/use of the back-channel chat at today's edlab. I admit, it was rather fun. And since this kind of activity is available in a lot of classrooms (especially higher ed), I think it's worth discussing its pedagogical implications. At first I wasn't sure I'd contribute much to the chat, but it became an intesting additional activity. I think think Prof. Kinzer's presentation was full of a lot of interesting content, but it wasn't particularly intellectually taxing. Right? i mean, it was more fun to imagine the implications alongside other...
Thinking about our discussion, I had the insight (!) that the way I figure out what is important or interesting is by observing what others think is important or interesting (or even funny) -- especially people I consider experts (or with whom I know I already agree). We're not doing solutions, but... If I could search for knowledge/information using a varietly of aliases, that would help me. I'd be willing to start with me -- some construction of my identity based on what I deemed to be my interests, projects, best work etc. -- and get whatever results that tossed up. But then I'd like to go ...
My congratulations to Christine, Suzanne and Hui Soo on the recent design exercise for the new library digital archiving and publishing system. I have been watching the Wow Factor climb with each exercise. This process combined with the new E-Collaboration capability can become a service for which people clamor.
The world into which I awake every morning is more riveting than the games I saw in the Edlab Seminar today. Watching strange beasts run around is interesting—-even thrilling for a moment—-but I find the novelty wears off in a short while. Quests? Role-playing? Even a little R&R? An appropriate comment was made: this is trivial stuff. But...