This website uses cookies and similar technologies to understand visitors' experiences. By continuing to use this website, you accept our use of cookies and similar technologies,Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, was on Morning Joe today promoting his book "Race Against The Machine. While his ideas are quite intriguing regarding the implications of rapid technological growth, his comments on entrepreneurship, education, and productivity were misleading at best. To pin the current economic woes on a lack of entrepreneurship and skills is to misread the short-term nature of our current problems. The financial crisis did not change the stock of human and physical...
Startup Weekends is an interesting event that takes place in many cities across the world. This event is catered towards anyone interested in finding other people to partner with or start a business or a product. About half of the people who attend these events are in the technical field with the other half in the business field. These two groups of people come together to startup an online or mobile business or product. The motto of the event is “no talk, all action,” which sounds like serious business to me. This three day event is dedicated to providing budding entrepreneurs with other like minded people so that they can work together to develop a product or business. People meet and form teams where they can begin working on their product or business, and these teams can still meet up after the startup weekend to continue establishing their business. To attend this three day event, you would have to register online and pay a fee, but this fee goes toward the food provided over the weekend. People will need to bring a laptop, business cards, a camera and videos of the event as well as their ideas for a new product or business! The weekend will start off with ice breaking activities, and 60 second pitches for each attendee's new startup. After pitches are finished, all attendees will vote on their favorites and using these votes the top ideas will be selected to be worked on over the weekend. Towards the end of the weekend, participants will finish up with their products and present their work to judges who will then pick the teams with the best business/product and hand out prizes. New York City also has these startup weekends and the next one will be on November 18th-20th. If you go to their website, you can find out more information on where the startup meets are and how to register for them. I think this is a great way to startup a business or product. The event provides entrepreneurs a chance to network with other like minded entrepreneurs, and it is in a fun environment where people can get really creative. Even though people attend the events eager to start something up, there is an added incentive in the event to try to come up with the best idea so they can win prizes! Some of these prizes are Incorporation Package from Cooley, Amazon Web Services Code for $200, 6 Months Shopify Credit & Chat with Shopify Execs, 1 hour consulting time with DFJ Gotham, and Free Account at Silicon Valley Bank. As you can see these are not usual prizes you would win from game shows, but I think these prizes are way more valuable to individuals seeking to startup their own businesses. Now that you know about this event, if anybody is interested visit the website for more information and resources.
Wow. From the Wall Street Journal.
The other day, a friend of mine from home mentioned that his startup was accepted into a program called "Imagine K12". The program seemed relevant to the EdLab's interests, so I thought I'd post a brief description here. "Imagine K12 is a for-profit enterprise looking to invest time, experience, energy and resources in entrepreneurs who have a passion for education and the technical know-how to create their vision. Over a three month period, we will draw on our extensive entrepreneurial experience, understanding of the Silicon Valley ecosystem, and knowledge of the education industry to he...
Check out some of the "courses" offered by General Assembly, "an urban campus for entrepreneurs seeking to transform industry and culture through technology and design. We provide programming, space, and support services to foster collaborative practices and learning opportunities." What can we learn from programs like General Assembly, particularly as it relates to the EdLab Entrepreneur in Residence Program and Launch Pad 39b? Pranav, Ankit, how you do think it compares with
The Philadelphia-based website Popent is another example of crowd-sourcing creative content. Companies ranging from Geico to Acuvue to Cholula hot sauce run ad competitions, and anyone can submit videos. Winning videos receive anywhere from $5,000-$15,0000. While some people might argue companies are getting new ideas at a fraction of the cost of an ad agency, others maintain that this is a great way to showcase talent and convince businesses to thin...
With the media storm this produced over the holiday, I'm surprised that there is not more talk about the Wikileaks issue. Geert Lovink and Patrice Reimens put together these 12 Theses. They are more meditative and so worth a read - most of the stuff are simple opinion pieces that are problematic (as always) in their own ways (emblematic of publishers political leanings...)/
With the holiday shopping system in full swing, here is an interesting piece from BusinessWeek discussing the development of Amazon's Prime membership and the major contribution it is making to overall sales. There may be some lessons for how we bundle and price our various offerings. Please note the "highly systematic" way they set the price for Prime
1 Comment
As a follow-up to last week's seminar discussion of commercialization, take a look at this piece in the NY Times that describes some new models of initiatives to move ideas from the lab to the marketplace.
Here I'd like to discuss a textbook exchange project I've been working on which some of you may be interested in helping develop. Before I explain the project, I first would like to present some facts: 1. There are approximately 17 Million college students in the U.S. 2. On average, each student pays $898/year for textbooks (CALIRG, 2005) 3. Retail bookstores make a 35.1% profit on the sale of used textbooks, on average (NACS study) 4. 1986-2004: Textbooks rose 186%, or 6% a year 5. 1986-2004: Other prices rose 3% (GAO study) 6. 50% of original price - Typical bookstore buyback price ...