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Here's another episode of Something Cool. I changed a few things around, tried a different title/outro, and kept the music going throughout the video. It sure was enjoyable following Jeff around while he built the Stack View camera! Cool stuff...
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Hey Lab. I'm posting this for some friends. It's a Call for Designers (but they definitely define "designer" loosely and all interested should apply). The program is called Making Policy public. Also be sure to check out this popular project from last year. This series is run by an organization called Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP). They focus on teaching all things city related to kids in schools (mostly hig...
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I was a bit fuddled when I tried to explain the least least popular popular searches on Friday. Not having done a thorough analysis, this is also somewhat of a fuddled post, but to slightly umuddle: By looking at the "Popular Searches" on the Gottesman homepage over time, it is possible to compile a list of popular searches. By arbitrarily only looking at the popular searches in the largest font (about 10% of the total), it's possible to accumulate a set of the most popular of the popular searches ("most popular popular"). If one looks at the most popular of these ("most popular of most...
So after lots of questions and really good discussions with EdLab members, I have pretty much focused my efforts down to the idea of concentrating on videobooth style installations for the library and EdLab. I will still be presenting some other documentation of my process as well. Why a videobooth? Videobooths are not particularly new and most people have some sort of videobooth software on their computer. Many also often have the ability to upload from their phones. But as you all know, video is time confusing and tough to produce. Given this, how do we establish a hi-bandwidth(lots of us...
What's been going on with the residency? I've explored the building a bit and written a few programs... The programs, with luck, work together to be the pieces of the piece. The programs are: least_popular_popular looks at the Gottesman Libraries homepage and records the popular searches listed at the bottom of the page. I have a compilation of several weeks worth of these, which serve as fodder for compositions. Rather than looking at the most popular of these ("math textbook"), I've enjoyed the weird outliers which, l...
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10 years ago
Please click the above image to see it full size. This is a simple prototype I made to demonstrate a web service I would like. Apologies for the sloppy design but hopefully the point is illustrated. I am interested in documenting process and sharing information. This is all part of my
It's been several weeks since Jeff, Dan P., and Dan T.--three of EdLab's artists-in-residents--presented their summer proposals to EdLab. Now that they've reached the halfway mark of their residencies, they're offering us a glimpse of what they've been up to, answering questions and potentially asking for feedback. Watch for their blog posts this week to get a sneak peek of what's to come on Friday. We will also be welcoming our fourth resident of the summer, Christina Kral. This will be your chance to learn more about her work and her proposed project that will continue into the fall sem...
A few days after I went to work on my EDAR project, Seth Kelly wrote asking if I had a piece for an all-audio show in a gallery. He described the radio program "Aufklärung für Kinder" (enlightenment for children), which Walter Benjamin created ("for merely economic reasons") from 1929 to 1933. “The organization of this show,” wrote Seth, “takes inspiration from Benjamin's metaphor of ‘the travelers return to those who never left' with invisible producers, antiquated communication techniques, and instant information exchanges, all within a summer recession.” A quick trip to the stacks came up with Jeffrey Mehlman's Walter Benjamin for Children: An Essay on His Radio Years, which provided a bit more background. On my computer at the EdLab, a chorus of digital voices began to recite some of the least popular of the recent popular searches at Gottesman. Seth's show proved an incentive to push this into some sort of shape. The Audio Show opens today at Friedrich Petzel Gallery. I stopped by yesterday evening, and the pieces I heard sounded great. I enjoyed how the personalities of the various participants — many presumably unused to working with audio — came through. I recommend paying the gallery a visit. (Note to self: things sound a lot different from speakers in a big room than they do softly playing on headphones.)
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Two videos I really like about the power of bringing more voices into the game. Also, these make me think, what are the defining characteristics of success in the web environment? Success is usually about removing barriers to information sharing and lowering the bar so that many people can participate (YouTube/Flickr/Facebook/Blogger/Twitter/Digg/Delicious/Wikipedia/etc...). This can create lots of "garbage", but it also creates a very rich environment for observation. It also empowers individuals to self organize without larger structures.
Yesterday, the vagabond historian EGWeing updated the Wikipedia page about the ONCE Group with a very nice (though quite unfootnoted) essay. ONCE was a 1960's collaboration for experimental performance (Robert Ashely was a prime instigator). I like in particular the article's list of goals and ideals: To exploit contemporary technological means to broade...