Oct 14 2011 - 04:06pm
EdLab Review: Paperight
Photobucket Paperight aims to bring print on demand out of the warehouse and into homes and small businesses around the world. Specifically aimed at the small-scale consumer, Paperight allows users to purchase printing rights to backlist titles for a nominal fee for download and one time printing. Pros: Paperight's license system is easy to understand and they seem to be devoted to customer (both publisher and home printer) support with a hearty blog, clean UI, and great advice for users who are new to POD. At the moment they are testing with a series of titles aimed at public health, but as their catalog grows so shall their usability. They seem to have built a good base site that has the potential to revolutionize the POD industry as we know it, traditionally an expensive and slow process for publishers. Cons: Paperight seems to hit an odd niche between printing technology and e-readers. It is particularly targeted at rural small businesses and libraries in far-flung locales. For that audience, it might work quite well. It has the power to bring near-on demand delivery to areas that may not be able to afford single computer stations or handheld devices. It's the Espresso Book Machine without all the bells and whistles. That said, it won't do much for libraries and businesses with options and clientele with picky format concerns. Features like Paperight's encouragement of filling ad-space on printed book pages to drive costs down won't fly with users who expect their books to look like books. EdLab Relevance: I'm thrilled that in the winter of publishing profitability, a suite of new ideas about the process have popped up like little daisies! There's so much we can do these days besides hording backlist titles that won't make enough to merit a printing. The long tail is stirring up out of print and POD in a very exciting way. It's hard to tell which ideas are going to stick, but there are a lot being thrown at the wall right now. Our Takeaway: Paperight is a novel take at POD that may hold on-demand power for businesses and libraries yet untouched by current DDA practice.
Posted in: EdLab Review|By: Laura Costello|918 Reads