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Jul 09 2010 - 04:10pm
Meet The Centsables!


Hey EdLabbers, So I saw a poster in the subway tunnel this morning for the Centsables, a new breed of Superheroes!!! Well, actually, it's a website created to teach kids about financial fitness and success. Created in comic book / graphic novel form with a fun web design and voices, the Centsables teach kids how to earn money, save money, and other responsibilities. It seemed like a fitting time to point people toward their website as a resource and creative way to teach about dollars and cents. The concepts are adorable yet effective. The characters work at the Bank of Centsinnatti. The bull's name is “Toro-nado.” The villain's name is “Credit-or.” They also have the all important glossary which highlights financial terms such as “Bank Teller,” “Bad Check,” and “Legal Tender.” The only downfall is every piece of the website opens in a new window which makes navigating a little tough. An all encompassing Flash-based site that is all in the same browser window would make it a little less messy. (Like here...There are sounds on mouse overs and the site “travels” in the browser making it easy to click on things). The idea behind Centsables is directly related to our project on Fiscal Responsibility. There are some key ideas to take away from Centsables.com: 1) It takes a challenging, dense, curriculum and turns it into an entertaining, creative, fun, and (key word) memorable project. 2) It proves that this topic is an important, relevant, and complex one that needs to be taught in a new, accessible form. While this is more “edu-tainment” made by an entertainment company and not rooted in an educational research institution like ours, it is good to look at the ways money is being explained to kids for the purpose of our fiscal responsibility project. Presenting concepts in an accessible, animated way (perhaps with a song or two?) may be a construct we should look at for our own project! Your new Centsable Hero, Michelle

Posted in: Teaching|By: Michelle Delateur|4514 Reads