This website uses cookies and similar technologies to understand visitors' experiences. By continuing to use this website, you accept our use of cookies and similar technologies,Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Jun 21 2019 - 09:06 AM
Getting Started on Rhizr - Everything you need to know to put together a top notch learning experience

Start here!


Welcome to the neighborhood



Here, have a fruit basket. 

Now that you've settled in, allow me to introduce myself. I'm Jo and I'll be showing you around your new community so that you get to feeling at home as quickly as possible.

I'll show you how to get the most out of your experience here. Are you interested in creating your own learning space? Or maybe you want to learn something new? The best part about Rhizr is that it takes all kinds to keep the community going. Learners are teachers, teachers are learners. By sharing ideas and knowledge, everyone benefits. 


What you will gain from exploring this rhizr:

  • How to reuse, revise, and remix content
  • The story behind the name "Rhizr"
  • Tips and tricks to create a meaningful learning space


Let's get this tour started already! You can continue by hitting the "Next root" button over on the side panel ------------>>>





What's in a name?


Everything!



"Rhizr" is a play off of "rhizome," as in "rhizomatic learning".

In botany, a rhizome is a plant whose roots grow laterally and nonhierarchically. 


A beautiful mess of a bamboo rhizome (via Wikimedia Commons)


Popularized by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari in their influential work, A Thousand Plateaus, their concept of a rhizome contains the following principles: (from Wikipedia)


1 and 2: Principles of connection and heterogeneity: any point of a rhizome can be connected to any other, and must be.

3. Principle of multiplicity: only when the multiple is effectively treated as a substantive, "multiplicity," that it ceases to have any relation to the One as subject or object, natural or spiritual reality, image and world.

4. Principle of asignifying rupture: a rhizome may be broken, but it will start up again on one of its old lines, or on new lines

5 and 6: Principle of cartography and decalcomania: a rhizome is not amenable to any structural or generative model; it is a "map and not a tracing"


(For more details and further elaboration of these principles, read the chapter of A Thousand Plateaus.)


So in a rhizomatic learning environment, ideas are interconnected, there is no such thing as "the right" path to take, and there are no boundaries. 

Interestingly, when a rhizome breaks, a new shoot will sprout as a result. In creating this environment, our hope is that ideas will grow both laterally and vertically, perpetually evolving as they develop.


Definitions

On Rhizr, we've separated learning components into three parts: 

1) The rhizr: This is the complete learning space. It is made up of nodes and roots. In this case, the rhizr is "Getting Started on Rhizr." 

2) The nodes: These are containers within rhizrs that categorize roots. Our node here is "Everything!"

3) The roots: This is where content lives. You're looking right at a root, baby!




Get inspired


Reuse, revise, and remix



As more people contribute to our learning ecosystem, the opportunity to evolve and build on the work of others also grows. 


Reusing, revising, and remixing ideas are central activities done within our learning environment. That's why all public roots are grabbable* and build-offable**. 


Remember, a rhizr is made up of nodes and roots. A root is what holds the information and what can therefore be remixed (or reused, or revised).


To reuse/revise/remix someone's root, hit the "Add to library" button in the root information section to the right of every root. Once you do that, you can plop it into one of your existing rhizrs or create a new one. Once you grab a root, you can modify your version to best suit your (or your learners') learning needs. You'll notice that the original author of the content will maintain proper attribution so we can give credit where its due. 


I encourage you to try searching the site for a topic or lesson you want to include in your rhizr. There's a chance someone's already covered it and you can simply grab it and go and save yourself some valuable time. 



*Anything's a word if you use it convincingly enough.

**Ok, that one was a stretch.


Create


Best practices



Be descriptive but not boring

First impressions are important. Get people excited to enter your rhizr and keep them there once they've had a peek! Be creative with your titles and naming conventions; realize that there could be innumerable rhizrs all on your subject. You'll want yours to stand out from the crowd! 


Sixth grader rule

If you were to teach your subject to someone who has very little base knowledge of it, how would that change your explanations? A good rule of thumb is to speak as though you're talking to a fellow sixth grader. Don't dumb things down, but don't convolute them either. If you follow this rule, you can teach anything to anyone. 


Be different

Why should I follow your rhizr on plate tectonics over someone else's? Offer something unique, whether it's in your voice, your resources, or your content. It's refreshing for learners and it can be more exciting for you, too!


See what other people have done

Maybe you need some inspiration, or maybe you want to include a section on a topic you don't have confidence in teaching. Have a search of the site for the topic in question and then copy and/or remix the resource to your own rhizr. A natural way to grow the rhizome! 


Use the right media

Currently, you can embed links, videos, images, word docs, and pdfs right into your roots (remember, this right here, this thing you're reading is a root). Use the media that best helps you to explain a topic. Refer to the sixth grader rule to know when and where to add additional media. 



A Beginner’s Guide to Rhizr




The Parts of a Rhizr

rhizr: the complete learning space, comprised of nodes and roots Screen Shot 2017-04-10 at 10.01.48 AM.png


node: containers within rhizrs  

     Node.png         Node 2.png


root: containers within nodes that hold the bulk of your content, including rich text, images, videos, and uploaded files

 


HIDE PREVIEW

            Root.png


              SHOW PREVIEW

             Root Preview.png



How to Create a Rhizr

Note: You need to be logged into your EdLab Account in order to create a rhizr.

  1. Setting up a rhizr

  • Click on the “Create” button in the navigation bar.  Rhizr create.png


  • Add a unique title, description, and cover image.


  • Click on the privacy button to the bottom-right of your cover image to control who can view your rhizr. It will be set to “Only You” by default.


           rhizr privacy.png

  1. Adding a node

  • Click on the “Add Node” button to the bottom-center of your cover image.


           add node.png

  • Give your node a title.


  • Adjust the visibility of your node by clicking on the    icon to the right of the title. Select either “Hide” or “Show” from the menu bar. The node is set to “Hide” by default.

node visibility.png


  • Select a unique color for your node by clicking on the “Color” button in the center of the menu bar.


          color.png   

  1. Adding a root

  1. Create your own root.

  • Click on the “New Root” button on the bottom-left of your node.

    new root.png


  • Enter root title.

  • Populate your root with content — text, photographs, videos, links, etc. root title.png


  1. Import root.

  • Click on the “Import Root” button on the bottom-right of your node.

                   import root.png

    • Select either a root from one of your other rhizrs or a saved root from another public rhizr. 
    • Reuse, revise, or remix the root as needed.


    Reuse, Revise, Remix

    As more people contribute to our learning ecosystem, there is greater opportunity to evolve and expand on the work of others. Reusing, revising, and remixing ideas are central activities done within our learning environment. All public roots are made replicable so that they can be easily build upon.


    Reuse: using the original version of another person’s root  

    Revise: fixing/updating the content of another person’s root

    Remix: adapting the content of another person’s root for a use different than originally intended


    To reuse/revise/remix someone's root, hit the "Add to library" button in the root information section to the right of every root.


                          reuse remix.png


    Once you do that, you can plop it into one of your existing rhizrs or create a new one. Once you grab a root, you can modify your version to best suit your (or your learners') learning needs. You'll notice that the original author of the content will maintain proper attribution so we can give credit where credit is due.


    Privacy and Visibility

    A rhizr can be in any one of three states:

    • 'Private': Only viewable by you and will not show up in search results.

    • 'Link-Only': Only viewable by those you share the link with. You can easily revoke this by making the Rhizr private again.

    • 'Public': Viewable by anyone. The Rhizr will also show up on search and explore pages.

    A node can be in one of two states:

    • 'Visible': A visible node is viewable by the public or anyone with access to that Rhizr.

    • 'Hidden': A hidden node is not viewable by the public or anyone with access to the Rhizr, and is only viewable by you (the creator) in edit mode.


    Best Practices

    Be descriptive but not boring

    First impressions are important. Get people excited to enter your rhizr and keep them there once they've had a peek! Be creative with your titles and naming conventions; realize that there could be innumerable rhizrs all on your subject. You'll want yours to stand out from the crowd!


    Sixth grader rule

    If you were to teach your subject to someone who has very little base knowledge of it, how would that change your explanations? A good rule of thumb is to speak as though you're talking to a fellow sixth grader. Don't dumb things down, but don't convolute them either. If you follow this rule, you can teach anything to anyone.


    Be different

    Why should I follow your rhizr on plate tectonics over someone else's? Offer something unique, whether it's in your voice, your resources, or your content. It's refreshing for learners and it can be more exciting for you, too!


    See what other people have done

    Maybe you need some inspiration, or maybe you want to include a section on a topic you don't have confidence in teaching. Have a search of the site for the topic in question and then copy and/or remix the resource to your own rhizr. A natural way to grow our learning ecosystem!


    Use the right media

    Currently, you can embed links, videos, images, word docs, and pdfs right into your roots. Use the media that best helps you to explain a topic. Refer to the sixth grader rule to know when and where to add additional media.



    About the Author


    Hi, my name is Jo. I don't work in a button factory.



    (If you got that reference, let's be best friends.)


    Joann Agnitti is the product manager of Rhizr and has a focus on user research. If you've ever sent an email to Vialogues or EdLab Accounts, there's a good chance she was the one who helped you out with your question.  Helping people's her favorite. 


    She received her masters of education from Teachers College Columbia University in counseling psychology. She also has a degrees in Psychology and Italian Studies. 

    Posted in: Rhizr|By: Panisuan Chasinga|97 Reads