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Library Blog
Born September 22nd, 1891 in Columbus, Georgia, Alma Woodsey Thomas was a late blooming African American artist who began to paint seriously after she retired in 1960 from her decades-long career as an art teacher in the public schools of Washington, D.C. Known as an influential leader in the Washington Color School, Alma Thomas produced m...
This research guide is intended as an overview of library resources and services of particular relevance for students Professor Carol Benson's Fall 2020 course ITSF 4091, Comparative Education. The resources, primarily electronic and accessible on and off campus, have been selected as ones that support the aims of the course: to introduce "theories in comparative and international education, along with comparative methods and current issues in the field relat...
Today’s headlines can barely be understood over the klaxons and flashing lights. These headlines are selected from the front pages curated by Newseum.org. Indigenous Territory names and Treaty information are taken from the
Happy Sunday! This collection of newspaper headlines from across the world take a look at how the Coronavirus has affected other countries. How these countries are and continue to deal with the pandemic in terms of schooling, job loss, and financial woes. These headlines of daily news are courtesy of Newseum. 
In The Shift to Remote Learning: The Human Element, Doug Lederman, editor and co-founder of Inside Higher Education, gathers expert opinions on how the "sudden, forced adoption of technology-delivered instruction" affects the well-being ...
This Saturday, we take a look at the life and legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away from complications with cancer Friday evening. She was 87. News outlets across the U.S. remember Justice Ginsburg for the advances she made towards women’s rights, contributions towards healthcare and LGBT rights, and her achievements as the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. She is mourned by the many people she inspired. The news also contemplates how her death and vacancy on the Supreme Court will im...
“Shana Tovah!” exclaimed today’s headlines. “Yes,” I concurred, “it’s nice to have something to celebrate.” Together, we look at how the faithful are celebrating Rosh Hashanah across the country, as well as how others folks are honoring memories of the fallen on this day. These headlines are selected from the front pages curated by Newseum.org
This research guide is intended as an overview of library resources and services of particular relevance for students Professor Ann Rivet's Fall 2020 course MSTC 6502, Science Education Seminar. The resources, primarily electronic and accessible on and off campus, have been selected as ones that support the aims of the course: to offer "an overview of current research in science education including some of the major theoretical perspectives and research par...
Good Afternoon! Here are the latest headlines from today’s front pages relating to legislative developments in Britain and America, the Fed’s signaling of monetary ease until at least 2023, the United States government’s potential complicity in war crimes in Yemen, and reports of massive flooding from Hurricane Sally in the Southeast. As always, the headlines are brought to us by
Constitution Day, also known as Citizenship Day, commemorates the signing of the Constitution of the United States on September 17th, 1787, when thirty nine delegates to the Constitutional Convention finalized one of our nation's most significant founding documents in Philadelphia, then capitol. The Constitution sets forth the supreme law of the land, democratic structure of our government, and greatest vision of human freedom, with cert...