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Submitted by Xiang Liu on Mon, 2016-02-08 10:29

A linebacker in NFL and Math Ph.D. at MIT. Yes, you heard it right. The Ravens linebacker John Urschel has been admitted to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics at MIT. And he decided to start his Ph.D. program this year.

Submitted by Daniel Agboba on Sun, 2016-02-07 18:22

We all recall back to 2015; a year where radical extremist groups such as ISIS and Boko Haram terrorized the world. We vividly remember the violent events in Paris in January and November. One of the emerging concerns that arose from the attacks is how we can combat terrorism. For example, ISIS wants an Islamic republic in the Middle East and Boko Haram is against the education of girls. This article talks about how education can act as a buffer to recruiting terrorists.

Submitted by Alseny Barry on Fri, 2016-02-05 01:49

Every year, youth organizations and youth representatives from UN Member States gather to discuss and address matters of concern to today's youth. This year I had the chance to attend this major meeting and participate in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This agenda is set to end extreme poverty, fight inequality, injustice, and tackle climate change by 2030.

Submitted by Ahmed Bagigah on Thu, 2016-02-04 00:39

The United States and UK will be losing foreign students to Canada and Australia. The two countries are seeking to attract more foreign students in order to improve their education system overall. Foreigners make up a big chunk of the student population in the United States. There about 4.5 million students globally leaving their home countries to study abroad.

Submitted by Malik Muftau on Wed, 2016-02-03 20:55

Assessment remains a very vital aspect of education. Several researchers have proven that students and teachers tend to improve when they evaluate themselves or when they are evaluated by superiors. Students and teachers are able to focus more on what they are not doing right when they receive feedback. Perhaps the most universal method of evaluating students is exams. There are exams that are usually designed for individual schools, states and in some countries, national exams are mandatory for every student.

Submitted by Youssef Ballo on Wed, 2016-02-03 09:56

Apple has developed educational tool named LearnSprout. LearnSprout allows teachers to track students' test scores, progress and organize classroom achievement targets. This educational tool is mainly for PC and Mac users. It helps create school oriented features and "it also includes a new classroom app for teachers that coordinates lessons and student usage of iOS devices.” LearnSprout can be the reason for schools to switch to iPads for their curriculum.

Submitted by Abdulrahman Sanda on Tue, 2016-02-02 22:27

For generations, African Americans have fought to achieve some form of economic stability. W.E.B Du Bois could be considered the grandfather of black scholars who strive to create such opportunities for black America. In his famous work, "The Talented Tenth," he "defined the urgency of black social responsibility". Dubois ideology stems from how "African-American demographic need to lead the race into an integrated equal America.

Submitted by Bismark Appiah on Tue, 2016-02-02 19:37

One of the issues that still remain unclear in international education is student-teacher ratio. The question is how many students per class would be considered as the right amount for a teacher? Personally, I believe that a class of 30 students or more can make both teaching and learning difficult for some teachers and students. Generally, some students perform well when the class is small. Contrarily, big classes propel other students to be at their best.

Submitted by Idrissa Bangura on Tue, 2016-02-02 09:56

In the midst of syllabus week at Boston College, I stumbled upon this interesting Posted in

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Submitted by Ahmed Bagigah on Tue, 2016-02-02 00:22

According to Davis Jenkins, Senior Research Associate at Teachers College's Community College Research Center (CRCC), only about 14% of transfer students earn a college degree in six years. This proves that the current community college system has failed to prepare students for the rigors of four year schools.