Google is All Business

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Wed, 08/04/2010 - 9:16pm.
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Google is going to turn off Google Wave. From a Business Insider post:

Google just announced that it is going to kill its super-futuristic messaging service, Google Wave, because no one wanted to use it.

Similarly, earlier this summer, Google announced that it was killing its Nexus One mobile phone store, because no one wanted to buy phones from it.

Sure, these are failed products, which isn't great. It's money, time, and talent wasted. And it creates bad press.

But give Google credit for quickly and soundly getting rid of them when it's clear they don't work.

I don't think it's fair to evaluate all our projects (software or otherwise) in this vein, but it does shed some light on a cut-throat culture that is more indigenous to business than academia... So, what are you ready to put on the chopping block?

 

Google Makes it Easy to Put Your Ad on TV?

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Fri, 06/11/2010 - 10:19pm.
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I had heard rumors about this, so I was excited to see a (seemingly real) Slate video on Google's new advertising service that allows one to buy TV spots. Wow, that's crazy, right? Take a look. I think it's worth some research into whether or not the cost of running ads during daytime hours is competitive... but even if it's not, the late-night strategy (explored here) is interesting. So, does this change anything? What do you think? Are you willing to pay money to put your ad on TV?

 

Pressible Launch Event, Tuesday 6/1, 10am-6pm on the 2nd Floor

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Thu, 05/20/2010 - 2:33pm.
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From the library news item here:

Pressible is a free, online publishing service supported by EdLab at Teachers College, Columbia University. On Tuesday, June 1st, library staff will host an all-day event at the library to introduce patrons to this new service.

With Pressible, you can create personal or multi-author sites. Sites can be used for a range of purposes, including personal blogging, group blogging, and other kinds of outreach. Pressible organizes content automatically, so you can focus on your ideas.

Every site is part of the Pressible network – a constellation of sites with a focus on education. Pressible helps you circulate and repost content from within the network, increasing your site traffic. And as the network grows, so does your site’s web presence.

How do you start? All you need is a Teachers College or Columbia University email address. Go to pressible.org, enter your site’s domain name and title, and click “Create Site.” In-person support is available at the Gottesman Libraries.

June 1st Activities:

  • 10am: Doors open. Library staff will help you join Pressible, or help you better understand the options available. Second floor publishing exhibitions showcase current academic publishing by the TC community.
  • 12-1:30pm: Seminar Lunch. Gus Andrews will present on using Pressible to publish a teaching case study on her media literacy project, The Media Show.
  • 2-4pm: Discussions at the Publishing Bar. Topics: How to Use Pressible (2pm), Putting Your Ideas Online (2:30pm), Publishing from a Publisher's Perspective (3pm), Producing and Publishing Video (3:30pm)
  • 4-6pm: Learn more! Pressible early adopters tell their stories; Q&A with the Pressible Development Team
  • Live music throughout the day!

Where: Second Floor Collaboration Space
When: 10am - 6pm

 

Kickstarter: A social-entrepreneurial dream come true?

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Wed, 05/12/2010 - 6:56pm.
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Kickstarter seems like a very cool tool. Seriously cool. I want to use it, for something... think what you could do with a bunch of project-specific cash if you knew you already had the support of a community to use it wisely!

Found via a Trends in Ed post!

 

What would you do with old curriculum materials?

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Thu, 04/08/2010 - 2:44pm.
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You're a student in a one-room schoolhouse in a middle-class New York community in 1910, and your teacher (who happened to be trained at Teachers College) projects this image onto the wall:

What does it mean to you? What does it mean for the history of education?

The library has a collection of 4000 images from magic lantern slides. These images were, one presumes, projected into the classrooms of yesterday (or, as the about.com page suggests, through the 19th century until the 1950's). They depict images from many disciplines, including social studies, natural science, mathematics, and so on.

But that's about the extent of our knowledge. Teachers who used these in the classroom aren't around to tell us about them, and the slides don't come with a user manual (not one that I've found yet).

So, what would you do? Is there a game that could make the collection of images richer? Something else worth doing? Or should they be relegated to the trash-heap of educational history (where lessons once learned are forgotten)?

We'll be putting the collection into PocketKnoweldge, and PocketKnoweldge Viewer (where they can be viewed as a slideshow). But that's all that's currently planned... which seems kind of sad to me.

 

34 hours to go...

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Tue, 04/06/2010 - 1:44am.
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Have you read it yet? Do you have any stories to share?

 

Linchpin

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Wed, 03/31/2010 - 12:57am.
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A somewhat random (and tangential?) thought.

 

Pressible 0.1 is ready for your content!

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Mon, 02/01/2010 - 1:57pm.
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We are excited to announce the release of Pressible 0.1 today! This is a very experimental release, though we are hoping you (the lab) and others hop on board and give it a try! Please see our features page for more details, but in a nutshell:

  • We're responding to Gary's vision for EdLab's publishing work that he's been articulating for at least the past year: Make a "powerful, networked, lightweight publishing solution for the TC community." And: "It should be a whole new genre for publishing." Well, no small task, to be sure, but we think Pressible is at least the beginning of an answer!
  • Pressible is highly "templated" -- meaning that users can't change much about the design of their site. Is this a good or bad idea? (Is it good or bad for Facebook?) In any case, it allows us to try some things out that wouldn't be possible otherwise. Watch for more visual elements in the future.
  • We think Pressible is a reinvention of blogging as a vehicle for publishing your ideas and work to the web in a fast, intuitive, and powerful way. Will you? Let us know!

Also, here are some things we think are cool about the project as a whole:

  • It's hosted entirely in the cloud -- a new experiment for an EdLab application.
  • It's built on the back of WordPress. We did kung fu on the data WordPress throws around to create cool results now, and even cooler results in the future.
  • Right now it's experimental, but we are hoping it can mature into a fully-fledged software project hosted by the Gottesman Libraries. We think it can become a way to not only serve the TC community (and alumni), but also individuals and organizations around the world.
  • We hope you break it. Really... we're ready to learn from our mistakes. So if you do, let us know!

We hope this is the beginning of a new stage in the lab's exploration of the future of publishing (hey, it may also be the end of the road!), and are excited to invite the lab to join us moving forward. We envision a lot of other features and functionality that did not make this release, and there are probably things we haven't even considered yet.

So, what are you waiting for? Sign up for Pressible today and begin your next big publishing project!

 

Pressible.org Buzz

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Wed, 01/27/2010 - 10:56am.
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Along with the Apple Tablet, this week (Friday?) will also mark the launch of the experimental "website theme" at the core of Pressible.org (What will it be? What will it look like? How much will it cost?). See the presentation outline below (submitted to Educause's 2010 conference) for a peek into our progress (and to put an end to some of the rampant speculation):

 

Digital Book World 2010 - Live from New York City

Submitted by Brian Hughes on Tue, 01/26/2010 - 11:39am.
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Hello Lab. Jeff and I are learning about the future of e-books today and tomorrow at Digital Book World's 2010 Conference. So far we've heard a bit about social media trends and Google's e-book strategy – interesting stuff. Check back for more posts as the event unfolds. (Also, because my laptop battery can't last forever, see my twitter feed here.)

To read comments chronologically, start at the bottom for first-level comments, and top-to-bottom for threads. (Please pardon the cludginess.)

 
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