Trends in Ed, 2.25.10

Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 02/25/2010 - 11:03pm.
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Robot teachers: Education has never looked so…creepy

Classrooms in South Korea will soon experience a boom in “R-Learning” programs with the introduction of robotic teaching assistants in 400 pre-school classrooms by 2012; 8,000 pre-schools and kindergartens are expected to have them by 2013. The robot TAs won’t have the responsibility of teaching the class by itself, but will assist by reciting stories and allowing parents to send messages to their kids. If the trial run has favorable results, the robot TAs could begin to make appearances in elementary classrooms.

Nevermind its Mrs. Potatohead appearance-- I can't help but wonder if they'll end up offering more of a distraction to students than assistance to busy teachers.

 

Trends in Ed, 2.18.10

Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 02/18/2010 - 6:57pm.
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Math sees a future with web 2.0

Is it a match made in Heaven? According to Maria Droujkova, developer of Natural Math and Math 2.0, it is! Droujikova saw the need for math to catch up to other subjects with regards to web 2.0 communities. Her response was to create math programs in which learning takes place within communities and networks-- a mashup between traditional math practices and social networking. This has given birth to the concept of social math:

Droujikova's framework covers five dimensions: mathematical authoring, community mathematics, humanistic mathematics, executable mathematics, and the psychology of mathematics learning and education.

Of those dimensions I was most interested in humanistic mathematics because it supposedly,"promotes activities that an audience can enjoy" in part by "infusing mathematics into robust artistic and musical communities." Full disclosure: I loathe all things explicitly mathematical.... but I'd be interested to see what hiding it behind a song could do! I....don't think math raps really does it for me, though.

But I admire what Droujikova is doing. You don't have to love math, but you do have to learn it. Why should this process be painful? Why not create innovate mashups; why not let math tell a story; why not try to understand math anxiety as a means to dispel it?

You can find more about the Math 2.0 initiative here.

And here's the article [the Journal] where you can read about Droujikova and her framework.

 

Trends in Ed, 2.4.10

Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 02/04/2010 - 4:49pm.
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Kids and Media

The Kaiser Foundation has released its latest report on kids’ (ages 8-18) media use and, not surprisingly, it’s up from 5 years ago.

Key findings:

  • Kids spend over 7.5 hours a day with some type of device (computer, tv, iPod). Wait, let me add to that: With the variety of devices available to kids, they often multitask, dividing their attention to more than one contraption at a time. This means they cram over 10 hours of media use into those 7.5 hours.
  • Photobucket

  • …And how about that whole school thing?
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    These kids should have been asked about their sleeping habits because… does that happen or what?

     

    Trends in Ed, 1.28.10

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 01/28/2010 - 5:45pm.
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    Online College Ed: Hot Hot Hot

    Since 2007, the number of students taking online courses has grown 17% (according to the Sloan Survey of Online Learning as reported by Yahoo). Perhaps the Swine Flu can be attributed to some of the growth glory: Many schools (two-thirds of those surveyed) have a contingency plan set up that they threw into action in the case of an outbreak.

    Of particular interest to us at the lab is the finding that faculty acceptance of online ed has remained the same as it was 2002. From the article: “Fewer than one third of chief academic officers--meaning provosts, deans, and the like--believe their faculty accepts the value and legitimacy of online education, the report says.” Yikes. Me thinks they should ease into the spirit by creating hybrid courses, which mix traditional and online learning; for example, alternating between in class sessions one week and online classes the next. Here’s the argument for that: “A new analysis of existing online-learning research by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) reveals that students who took all or part of their class on line performed better, on average, than those taking the same course through traditional face-to-face instruction (source).”

     

    Admissions steps it up

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Fri, 01/22/2010 - 11:30am.
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    Drama! Catchy music! It makes me want to go to Yale!

    CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO FUN

    ...Or at least wish I had gone to Yale so I could have been in the video :)

    The Yale admissions office took a risk with this wacky marketing move... and I liked it! Were it not 16 minutes long, I would probably watch it again. The video is in no doubt a response to a decrease in applications for the class of 2014. So, in a rallying effort to inspire potential cash co— uh, students—to send in their applications, this little gem was born.

    Why am I posting a Yale vid on a Columbia blog? Well, because I think both schools, while undoubtedly held in high esteem, are also notorious. I applaud their willingness to harness the power of social media to spread their message. Is it all hype? It could be! But I don't see other schools {ahem} trying to invigorate its past-and-present patrons with risky maneuvers of their own!

     

    Trends in Ed, 1.14.10

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 01/14/2010 - 4:44pm.
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    Years in the Making

    Microsoft has announced that it is sponsoring The Innovative Teaching and Learning Project, led by the nonprofit SRI International in coalition with Finland, Indonesia, Russia and Senegal. Microsoft will contribute $1 million annually to the multi-year project, the goal of which “is to assess teachers’ adoption of innovative classroom teaching practices and the degree to which those practices provide students with personalized learning experiences.” Methodologies, data, and reports will be public and free to everyone (score!) starting this summer and continuing every year after.

    This study goes beyond what we've been seeing in terms of teacher tech use because of its longitudinal focus on teaching, tech, AND personal learning. I look forward to seeing the first results in a few months!

     

    Trends in Ed, 1.7.09

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 01/07/2010 - 6:01pm.
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    How can you be a better student this year?

    Photobucket
    (Click for article link)

    Apparently you just need to get more use out of your computer.

    I consider myself relatively tech savvy but even I have never even thought about (or desired to) using some of the apps and tools suggested in the article. Call it antiquated, but my sloppy pen-and-paper notes were the most useful ones. Still, it’s interesting to see how enthusiastically the author pushes students to adopt these modern conveniences.

    Thanks to Lifehacker.com

     

    A Year in Trends

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 12/31/2009 - 5:31pm.
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    Trends in Ed has survived its Freshman year! We’ve brought you a slew of new tools, services, products, and ideas that have made a splash in the education sector. In this special installment you will find Trends’ 10 hottest topics of 2009 and speculations of their impact in the coming year.

     

    Trends in Ed, 12.17.09

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 12/17/2009 - 6:26pm.
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    Rundown of the countdowns

    The end of the year always compels people to make predictions about the coming year. Big thinkers, the practically-minded… they all have their ideas of what will happen. With that, I give you 3 of the 2010 trend lists that I found particularly intriguing...

    5 K-12 Technology Trends for 2010
    from THE Journal
    1. eBooks Will Continue to Proliferate
    2. Netbook Functionality Will Grow
    3. More Teachers Will Use Interactive Whiteboards
    4. Personal Devices Will Infiltrate the Classroom
    5. Technology Will Enable Tailored Curricula

    Wow, this is heavy on the tech side! What happens, though, to the schools who can’t keep up with any/all of these trends? And the divide widens… though, I do agree with the increased use of Netbooks.

    5 Higher Ed Tech Trends To Watch in 2010

     

    Trends in Ed, 12.10.09

    Submitted by Joann Agnitti on Thu, 12/10/2009 - 12:12pm.
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    Out of touch with tech

    What is the current and future role of technology in higher ed? CDW-G has tackled this question in its latest study, “The 2009 21ST century campus report: Defining the vision.”

    Over 1000 students, faculty, and IT staff members reported on their engagement with technology on campus and with educational materials. Some interesting findings:

    Photobucket

  • Students, faculty and IT staff agree that the 21st-century campus is defined by access – wireless access, resource access and access to each other
  • Students increasingly associate educational value with campus technology; 81% use technology every day to prepare for class, up from 63% in 2008
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