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Submitted by Laura Costello on Mon, 2015-05-11 15:25

EDUCAUSE published a white paper last month exploring the gap between current online learning systems and the things that students and faculty actually want in virtual education spaces. They suggest that the LMS is going to evolve into something they are calling the next generation digital learning environment (NGDLE), a flexible, personalized ecosystem of tools that combines the administrative control functions of an LMS with best practices in online learning:

If the paradigm for the NGDLE is a digital confederation of components, the model for the NGDLE architecture may be the mash-up. A mash-up is a web page or application that uses content from more than one source to create a single new service displayed in a single graphical interface. Hence it uses a heterogeneity of components to produce a homogeneity of function. The confederation-based NGDLE will be mashed up at both the individual and the institutional levels, as opposed to consortia forming to create open enterprise applications.

Submitted by Laura Costello on Wed, 2015-01-07 12:23

Check out this article about the Orange County Library System in Orlando, which used iBeacon to set up location-based push notifications throughout the library to help patrons find events and collections relevant to their interests. This might be an interesting feature to integrate into the learning theater; I can imagine something like push help and directions for new technologies. How do you think something like this could be used in the libraries existing or planned spaces?

Submitted by Laura Costello on Mon, 2014-06-30 13:12

I'm just wrapping up my last day here in Vegas. I present in a little over an hour and the Ignite sessions have been really well attended! I'll try to tweet a pic from the podium :) Here's a report from my weekend:

Saturday:
In the morning I attended a session aimed at technical services leaders in academic libraries, the focus was primarily on developing cataloging standards in the age of web searching, but it was great to get a chance to discuss common issues and compare notes with the crowd.

I then headed over to the conference center to give my Roomer talk. There were about 60 people there and I was one of nine short presentations. There was only time for four questions at the end, but three of them were about Roomer!

After that I went to a session sponsored by Innovative Interfaces (our integrated library systems vendor) to hear about their upcoming product developments. Not too much to report here, they have recently merged with two other companies but nothing much should change for us on the front end. After that I attended a panel discussion on copyright developments that had an awesomely rowdy librarian audience. There was quite a bit of hissing.

Submitted by Laura Costello on Sat, 2014-06-28 03:59

Greetings from the American Library Association Annual Conference in sunny Las Vegas! I got in last night and have been having many adventures. Here are my daily highlights!

Zappos:
This morning I toured the Zappos headquarters in downtown Vegas. Zappos moved into a new location last year in the former Vegas city hall and their building cuts boldly into the skyline of the low-lying downtown and surrounding desert. Activity on the campus is centered around this municipal-chic pavilion:
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Their campus is set up around team-based open plan office areas and a variety of move spaces like coffee shops, patios, and private rooms. (To book these spaces, Zappos even has a Roomer-esque iPad reservation platform!)

Submitted by Laura Costello on Fri, 2014-02-14 12:01

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The Learning Space Design Collection is now available for coffee-time perusal in the cafe! These books explore library and learning space architecture and planning, design elements like furniture, alternative classroom use cases, and even digital learning space design.

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Submitted by Laura Costello on Wed, 2014-01-15 15:01

Our comments from the OCLC Library Design Webinar, Flexible Spaces — Flexible Futures.

A full recording of this webinar is now available.

Submitted by Laura Costello on Wed, 2013-10-30 10:00

Princess Nora Bint Abdulrahman University (PNU) is a recently completed campus that combines three existing women's universities in Saudi Arabia. The campus space can accommodate up to 60,000 women. The design of the campus incorporates heat shielding techniques including an awesome water and air-powered cooling system in the outdoor courtyards. The exterior buildings are also obscured so students could de-veil inside the campus. This new university is also interesting because though more women than men receive post-secondary education in Saudi Arabia, their job prospects are dismal; women make up only about 14% of the workforce.

More pictures after the jump

Submitted by Laura Costello on Wed, 2013-10-16 11:11

I've never really thought much about chairs, but recently, in ruminating on the 4th floor redesign, I've been noticing them more often. A functional and appropriate place to sit is an important feature of almost every library throughout history and especially aligned with the core mission of space in modern libraries. Here are some intriguing chair resources and ideas I've encountered recently:

Submitted by Laura Costello on Fri, 2013-05-31 16:00

 giant searchbar

Columbia is debuting a new library homepage on Monday which features, just below its mega banner, a trendily huge search bar. I've been thinking about search bars quite a lot lately as the library prepares for a transition to Serials Solutions Summon. Columbia is running a version of the open source catalog Blacklight, but the concept of a massive, google-esque search of all library resources is common to both Blacklight and Summon.

Columbia preview

Submitted by Laura Costello on Tue, 2013-04-16 16:39

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This morning I attended a Serials Solutions webinar on the latest iteration of the Summon discovery system. If you attended the Materials Need for Speed D&R in March, you know that Summon is a federated search of the library's electronic resources that functions with a single search bar and has faceted results. Summon 2.0 is an upcoming release (June) that focuses on UX improvements to the system based on Serials Solutions' analysis of usage patterns in Summon and interviews with students. These improvements include:

  • A decluttered facets bar with increased whitespace
  • Facets ordered based on popularity
  • Fewer results shown, with more information for each result